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Walsh Construction Svcs.
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I just got a call from someone who wants a 3-car garage converted into office space. They want to remove the existing garage doors and replace with windows. They also want the floor raised up so you don't have to step down into the space.

My question is what do I need to take into account as far as vapor barrier , sealing the concrete, and insulation? Also, what is the best way to frame the floor out? It's gotta go up about 2 foot. I'm guessing something like framing a deck on a house? I can handle building the interior walls, sheetrock, etc. This is the first time I've ever had to raise a floor up. The finished room will heve 10' ceilings when done.

Any advise will be greatly appreciated!! :Thumbs:
 

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I would run a row of block where the garage doors were to keep the walls off the ground and warter getting in (easy job).
I would also frame the deck in like a house using 2x for beams to hold the joists and block under the beams where needed for support.
No need to do anything to the concrete just frame over it.
Be sure to get any heating ducts in before you cover the floor if they call for them.
Bringing the floor up 2' will limit the window height to 42" Max(If you have a 7' garage door height) giving you 18" off the floor. Any lower and they need to be temperd glass.
Pretty much a easy inside job out of the weather :Thumbs:
Brent
 

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Well since you are asking for opinions I'll give mine on the way I would approach this job. First, I would think of this job as an addition with a crawlspace. Check your code you will most likely have to provide foundation vents for ventilating under the floor. When you put your beam in, the inspector will want to know what is holding it up, ie. concrete piers w/footing below or short lolly columns w/footing below. Maybe in FL other states with no frost you can put support right on the slab. If the existing foundation is block, and this is my personal way of doing things, I would saw cut the slab in the door openings and break out the concrete that is poured over the block and then lay my courses right up so they end up without a cold joint on the slab floor. Also since this is going to be an office I would try to bury some conduit somewhere so there are provisions for the customer if they need to update with extra data/com lines in the future. Again, my opinion.
 
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