Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Administrator
Maker of Fine Sawdust
Joined
·
51,695 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Read that as pain in the ass cabinet. I am making a boat shaped two door lazy Sue cabinet. Crazy angles and different thickness stock mitering into each other. Oh..so fun






Figured out the angles on the CAD. And did some test pcs and they seem to fit rather nicely. We'll see what happens when I start cutting into the real pcs. The fun part should be the gluing up of the cabinet. I can't wait for that.


Pretty close to finishing up this cabinet. Took a bunch of the day to get it glued up. I had to fit the sides, then glue them up. Put in some stretchers, cut the first angle on both face frames, double check the true working angle instead of the CAD theoretical angle. Most of the angles were within 1/2 degree and some were right on. Cut the second angle on both FF's.

I made a jig to glue the angles together and it worked real well for the first FF. But the second didn't like the jig. After a few minutes with the glue on I decided that it wasn't going to work and I pulled it off before the glue set up. So I cleaned up the glue by scraping it with a razor blade.

So I played around with a few other options and found one that worked and glued it up. While I was waiting for things to dry on each successive glue up I was in the spray room coating the other cherry cabinets I had made.

The last pc was the front with an angle on both sides. I cut the angles and found that the dado needed to be a bit deeper. So I cut it a bit deeper and got it fit nice. The board had a slight bow in it and I was able to use that to my advantage. Put the pc in the dado and put a clamp on it. Then put a couple of clamps on the top. The bow was towards the inside of the cabinet so I put a clamp across each FF to squeeze them and got some perfect joints.

Here are a few shots:









Even the toekick was fun (read: PITA). Much simpler to fabricate then the cabinet. Made a simple jig to glue it up. Just a board the length of the toekick and a couple of 90º ends to trap it in. I put 4 clamps on the top and it basically held itself together because I was able to use biscuits in it.



 

·
Administrator
Maker of Fine Sawdust
Joined
·
51,695 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
End of the run peninsula


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
Looks good!

I guess that you don't do a lot of boat furniture where this stuff is cabinetry 101. Odd angles are the norm as are curves and then some have to be fitted to the curvature of the hull.

I ejoy challenges.
 

·
Administrator
Maker of Fine Sawdust
Joined
·
51,695 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nor am I being paid to buikd boat cabinetry...Challenges inhibit profit.
 

·
Maker of fine kindling
Joined
·
6,199 Posts
Looks nice Leo

Are you familiar with 3M clamping tape?

It's like masking tape but thicker and has a slight flex to it. Works great on Mitered frames.
 

·
Administrator
Maker of Fine Sawdust
Joined
·
51,695 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I almost went that route. But each pc had a slight bow to it and it made it kind of hard to manipulate them together. I was just going to use clear packing tape if I couldn't find a clamping solution. But I did, so it is a moot point now.
 

·
Maker of fine kindling
Joined
·
6,199 Posts
Next time we do this I'll post some pics for those that are not familiar with it.

But basically you place strips of tape across the two parts while they are flat with one of them an 1/8" offset of the other. Then fold the miter together and the tape flexes to accommodate the 1/8" movement applying "clamping" pressure.

Works best when the parts are nice and straight as does any clamping but it helps a lot. Still need to clamp in a few spots usually.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top