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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I came across this gem when demoing a bathroom today. It had previously been remodeled with a second story added on years ago.

The second floor joist (2x6 @9' span) run parallel to the floor joist (also same span 2x6). This wall is not really load bearing by design, but the load has shift as a result of the joist deflection. The support beam is 3' away from this wall that separates the bath from the hallway. I put in new joist along all existing floor joist, but this king studs are only being held by 80 year old Douglas fir hardwood.

I have a few ideas on how to address both of the king studs to carry the point load, but am curious what you would prefer short of shoring the ceiling and gutting it and reframing the entire wall and door.

This was a simple refresh and subfloor repair to install new tile that went down hill. Installing blocking under the king studs, pouring footing (dirt floor in basement) and installing a steel post under each king stud seems to be the easy way handle it.

What are your thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The king and jack studs on each side of the doorway are in the middle of the joist bays. These old houses often had no subfloors, just finished hardwood direct nailed to joist.

As you can see in the pic, the load from the door header is forcing the studs downward, the hardwood has cracked from the pressure. The load path needs to be carried by structure to resolve the issue.
 

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Oh okay that makes more sense now. Sounds to me like that's a good plan of attack. Sorry I can't offer any better advice, I'm still pretty new to building trades. About all the work I've ever done has been in crazy old buildings so I know what a bucket of worms it always is.
 

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Around here we usually pour a footing in the basement and support it with a steel post.We run string lines and check all of the existing beams and shim where needed (if there is something to shim against) or pour footings and posts to level.
Easiest and cheapest to do which is most often what the HO wants.
Load bearing or not it's nice to have a flat (not always level) floor.
 

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Brace the floor in the basement

Insert a beam parallel to the doorway.

If you can spam the beam from bearing point to bearing point under the doorway, even better.

About tearing out the framing around the door?

Not necessary.

Put in the beam to stabilize.

If you think you can jack it up a bit with a few bottle jacks to "straighten" the floor, without cracking all the plaster, have at it.


image-1879764338.jpg

This is not the exact application, but a beam can be inserted into old framing without destroying the wall, ceiling joists and in this case the cripple studs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Around here we usually pour a footing in the basement and support it with a steel post.We run string lines and check all of the existing beams and shim where needed (if there is something to shim against) or pour footings and posts to level.
Easiest and cheapest to do which is most often what the HO wants.
Load bearing or not it's nice to have a flat (not always level) floor.
The deflection from the beam to that area is about 3/4 down, at the mid span of the joist (middle of bath floor) it was down about 1 1/2". With the timeline and budget on this, it won't get level. It would require new joist in the entire house. I'm there to strengthen and flatten the bath as much as possible, put down SLC to level the bath, install tile, fixtures, paint, etc.

I think I will block that entire wall (10' or so), set a drop beam riding on 4 steel post... I don't want my tile cracking.

Unfortunately for the owner, he had the painter there last week patching and painting the surrounding rooms. :/
 

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I have the same problem in my house. I have a beam that is attached to the walls on either side and set on the hardwood. I didn't check before sheetrocking it and now I have a small deflection in the floor and am not sure if it is new or been there all along.

I'm just going to crawl underneath and set a beam with 3 piers in the spot the old long gone continuous wall was. Two under each end to support the "posts" and one in the middle to support the floor. I have two spots I need to do it, so I'll just do them both at once. Luckily it is an 18-20 inch crawlspace, so it will be simple.

On your's I would just simply set a beam or tripled 2x with a post underneath each side of the door between the joists if it isn't over a basement. These old houses are pretty resilient, so anything you can do to add a little strength will work fine.
 

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I came across this gem when demoing a bathroom today. It had previously been remodeled with a second story added on years ago.

The second floor joist (2x6 @9' span) run parallel to the floor joist (also same span 2x6). This wall is not really load bearing by design, but the load has shift as a result of the joist deflection. The support beam is 3' away from this wall that separates the bath from the hallway. I put in new joist along all existing floor joist, but this king studs are only being held by 80 year old Douglas fir hardwood.

I have a few ideas on how to address both of the king studs to carry the point load, but am curious what you would prefer short of shoring the ceiling and gutting it and reframing the entire wall and door.

This was a simple refresh and subfloor repair to install new tile that went down hill. Installing blocking under the king studs, pouring footing (dirt floor in basement) and installing a steel post under each king stud seems to be the easy way handle it.

What are your thoughts?
I would cut three 2x6 to width, nail them together, insert under the sagging door framing, jack it up till it's pleasing, install specific hanger, nail according to specs remove jack..... done :thumbup:
 

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philcav7 said:
We put double blocking under that entire wall area, poured footings today and will be installing a drop beam directly under to carry the load.

This will provide continuous support and prevent further settling...I don't want my tiles cracking/lifting.
Blocking?

Squash Blocks maybe?

Drop beam?

Inserted a beam from below or cut up all the subfloor and "dropped" it in?

Pictures maybe?

Please?
 

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We put double blocking under that entire wall area, poured footings today and will be installing a drop beam directly under to carry the load.

This will provide continuous support and prevent further settling...I don't want my tiles cracking/lifting.
Seems like a bunch of work and now the homeowner has to deal with two posts and a low beam in the basement/ crawler.....

Blocking and hangers would have done the same thing by simply transferring the load to the existing double 2x6 joists. and you could have done this everywhere you needed extra support........

And, why ask for advice when you were planning footers, posts and a beam anyway. Hopefully someone else will find this helpful. :rolleyes:
 
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