Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Typical detached garage slabs are poured with 2-4" of slope in my area. Some have curbs, most don't.

I've seen a lot of framing methods addressing the slope (I have my preferred approach) and was curious what you all do.

Method I use:

I've found the most accurate and time- (re: cost-) effective method for myself is measuring with a surveyor's level every 12", drawing the slope in CAD, then printing out a numbered cut list for my helper (I am marking plates while my helper cuts).

Some of the other methods I've seen:

- Completely ignore the slope. Frame a square wall and let the garage lean into the alley. - The individual doing this in my area undercuts everybody by ~75%

- Cut a full length shim out of 6x PT material (essentially creating a level curb) - I've only seen one guy do this. I like that you don't have to cut individual studs, and it raises untreated material even further from grade. I don't like needing 6"+ anchors on the more extreme slopes.

Methods I've read:

- Erect: Stand the ends and mark the tall side with a string level. Toe-nail studs, snap a chalk line, and cut each in the air.

- On the ground: Measure the overall slope and cut the tall stud accordingly. Lay interior studs, snap a line, and cut each. (Very similar to my approach, minus a pre-calculated cut list).

So, what's your preferred approach?
 

·
Shingler extraordinaire
Joined
·
9,645 Posts
Your precalculated cut list is pretty cool. I've ran a string at corner height, then measured to the string , and then framed my wall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I pour the slab flat around the perimeter and slope the floor from about a foot inside the walls.
Doing so avoids this issue completely.
I wish I had that luxury. Unfortunately, the vast majority of garages I build are on pads poured by cookie-cutter home builders. They will pour level perimeters for a cost - but most homeowners don't understand the point/benefits of it.
 

·
GC/carpenter
GC/Carpenter
Joined
·
42,351 Posts
I wish I had that luxury. Unfortunately, the vast majority of garages I build are on pads poured by cookie-cutter home builders. They will pour level perimeters for a cost - but most homeowners don't understand the point/benefits of it.


That's why you explain to the home owner that it's more expensive to not pour the slab with level perimeters due to fact that it's easier to form than frame. A little home owner education goes a long way in this business. Communication is key!


Mike.
_______________
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
That's why you explain to the home owner that it's more expensive to not pour the slab with level perimeters due to fact that it's easier to form than frame. A little home owner education goes a long way in this business. Communication is key!


Mike.
_______________
I couldn't agree more.

Unfortunately by the time most homeowners contact me, they've signed off with their home builders and hefty penalties accompany any alterations.
 

·
Registered
Remodel
Joined
·
28,203 Posts
Simple slope, I measure the drop and gang cut the studs, after first "squaring up" one end to account for the drop, and then cut the other end square. No miter saw, just a circ saw. Nail together and stand it up.

How the wall gets attached to the slab can make a big difference in cost.
 

·
Registered
Remodel
Joined
·
28,203 Posts
If you're marking each stud and then cutting, string a chalk line between the corners at the right height, then take each stud, set it each in place, mark with the chalk line, then cut them all and toe nail.

Working alone, this is easiest and fastest to cut on the ground, IMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
If it was my own place I would build a curb and put the walls on that. Other than that, my first thought would be to rip shims for under the plates, depending on how severe the slope was.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
The method we use is to shoot control points at all corners, cut the studs for those corners so that the tops of them are exactly the same level.

Then run a chalk line from top to top, mark each stud to the line and cut. Perfectly level, very fast, and dead on accurate.

The pictures are from 2007, man I've aged!:eek:



 

·
Registered
Remodel
Joined
·
28,203 Posts
The method we use is to shoot control points at all corners, cut the studs for those corners so that the tops of them are exactly the same level.

Then run a chalk line from top to top, mark each stud to the line and cut. Perfectly level, very fast, and dead on accurate.

The pictures are from 2007, man I've aged!:eek:



So you mark them in place, then cut on the floor? Gang cut?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Nope we just cut them, nail the plates on and lift the wall
So if I understand correctly, you lay your bottom plate and brace the ends, mark and cut each stud, then build the wall on the floor? Or are you toe-nailing each stud?
 

·
GC/carpenter
GC/Carpenter
Joined
·
42,351 Posts
So if I understand correctly, you lay your bottom plate and brace the ends, mark and cut each stud, then build the wall on the floor? Or are you toe-nailing each stud?


The chalk line applies the mark in the air. I like it!


Mike.
_______________
 

·
Registered
Remodel
Joined
·
28,203 Posts
So if I understand correctly, you lay your bottom plate and brace the ends, mark and cut each stud, then build the wall on the floor? Or are you toe-nailing each stud?
Doing it that way, you don't toe nail.

A few months ago I watched a guy toe nail them all in standing up and then put the top plate on in place. Not my idea of a good time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Doing it that way, you don't toe nail.

A few months ago I watched a guy toe nail them all in standing up and then put the top plate on in place. Not my idea of a good time.
That's exactly what I was thinking.

Based on the replies in this thread, it seems like marking with chalk is a favorite. Maybe I'll forego my pre-calc'd cut list on the next sloped pad - at least it'll save an extra trip to a site.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,439 Posts
I've never had to do it but, I think I'd probably use a laser level to calculate the slope and construction master to tell me the stud lengths.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Stilla
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top