Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm having a little problem wrapping my mind around the proper way to address a project that was dropped in my lap this week.
What I have to do is frame the two slanted shed roof line(in the copy of the plan )
The main roof is all trusses,the tops of which sit at 19" above a steel beam opening where these roofs will be framed.
The exterior walls will run out to 8' from from the main building in a length of about 25'.
It's a 6/12 pitch,so the bottom of my rafters will be about 16" below the steel beam at the 8' point.
No detailed drawings have been supplied for this area,so I'm at a loss at how I'm going to obtain lateral support for this wall as it drops below the beam.

Also,the top plate has to be at a downward slope towards the 8' distance,forcing me to cut the birds mouth at the corresponding angle and pitch.
Am I missing something here?
Is there another way to approach this?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looks like a great way to accomplish the rafter to plate connection without weakening the truss extensions with bird mouths.
I'll see if the PM can get approval for this.

It seems I should also run a return back to the beam for lateral support here.
Maybe by framing a short wall under the steel , level with the of the lowest point of the exterior wall.Then installing ties from this wall to the exterior.
Am I over thinking this?
Has anyone here run across a similar configuration?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,671 Posts
Is situations like that, we sometimes run the fascia first and prop and brace it. Then install rafters, then build the wall up under. Some here would probably tell you to do the wall first, but that area seems pretty small and I think the fascia hanging way would work well. Lot less math involved too.
 

·
The Duke
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Is situations like that, we sometimes run the fascia first and prop and brace it. Then install rafters, then build the wall up under. Some here would probably tell you to do the wall first, but that area seems pretty small and I think the fascia hanging way would work well. Lot less math involved too.
Same here Warren. Kind of just like you show there in the last pic. Run the tails and keep them straight with some strapping or similar, plumb up to the underside of the tails, run a plate across, stud up one at a time.

Kind of an odd looking set of walls, but that's commercial for you. Is that a car dealership? What is the business, not that it's any of my business?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Same here Warren. Kind of just like you show there in the last pic. Run the tails and keep them straight with some strapping or similar, plumb up to the underside of the tails, run a plate across, stud up one at a time.

Kind of an odd looking set of walls, but that's commercial for you. Is that a car dealership? What is the business, not that it's any of my business?
This is new to me,seeing I've only done residential.
It took three weeks for PM to get a decision on this area because they thought they wanted to change it to accommodate a freezer.

This is going to be three units.The owner is going to have a full service Bakery and lease out the two others.

Do you guys think any bracing is needed back to the beam,like a ceiling joist.
 

·
The Duke
Joined
·
14,746 Posts
Do you guys think any bracing is needed back to the beam,like a ceiling joist.
No. If you're attached to the bottom plate with anchor bolts and to the top with nails to the tails, ply the wall and it will be very solid. You may need some CJ's to finish out their ceiling though.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top