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Best looking Carpenter
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I was curious as to what order you build your houses. Do you move forward and try to enclose the structure as fast as possible? Do you cut out windows and doors right away or leave them covered until the roof is on? do you remove braces (that are no longer needed) and cut sill plates out before you put the roof on? Are there little things you would skip in order to enclose the structure first? What are your priorities? Obviously you build from the ground up but I think the faster you can get the roof sheathed and the building enclosed the better. I would ignore some details in order to work with a roof over my head. What do you do?
 

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Some or all of the above. No set rules. It depends more on weather than anything, hot/cold/windy/muddy, etc. I generally sheet walls down, so I'm always going to cut windows out then. If it's winter and we're using Tyvek, I'll leave the Tyvek over the openings. I frequently frame and sheet my overhangs on the deck as well, up to a point. The one I'm on now I didn't because it's 1) December, 2) 9', 10', 11' and 12' exterior walls with lots of transitions, [see Street of Dreams 2014 below] and 3) I was going to be gone over the holidays and wanted all the walls up before leaving.

I don't generally pull any braces or cut door plates until the roof is sheeted, but I'll make an exception if there's an opposing brace that covers the area once the ceiling and roof are framed.

It's a pretty fickle arrangement. I would prefer to start framing overhangs Thursday after I finish roof sheeting tomorrow, but it will be below zero at 8 am and there's a 400,000 btu heater in the basement and 200 gallons of propane on site, so I'm going to do some basement framing.

So, no hard and fast rules for me, just stay flexible and go with what the job gives you.
 
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Cutting out windows, no need to wait, I cut them out as I go. Braces come off whenever everything around them is sheared and I know they won't go anywhere.

Most the crews I've been on don't really worry about getting the roof on fast if it means skipping stuff. Whenever you skip something it always ends up taking more time having to come back to it and finish later. I have been on a couple crews that will leave things off like sheet rock backing or even entire partition walls only so they can get the roof on faster. Only advantage I see is you can start the roofing and siding sooner. But when you do that, the plumbing and mechanical becomes the critical path in your schedule and really doesn't do anything to speed up the project in my opinion.
 

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KemoSabe
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I always prefer finishing each phase before moving on. If I'm framing walls, I frame all the walls, with few exceptions.

Wall sheathing is done just before the roof framing and windows are trimmed out with a router as we go. The only exception to cutting out windows would be if the weather predictions favor a protected building.

Roof framing is complete before roof sheathing begins, unless a section gets an overframe. I prefer to have plywood run under the valley seat.

I've found that leaving things and going back is a production killer in the end.
 

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I always prefer finishing each phase before moving on. If I'm framing walls, I frame all the walls, with few exceptions.

Wall sheathing is done just before the roof framing and windows are trimmed out with a router as we go. The only exception to cutting out windows would be if the weather predictions favor a protected building.

Roof framing is complete before roof sheathing begins, unless a section gets an overframe. I prefer to have plywood run under the valley seat.

I've found that leaving things and going back is a production killer in the end.
That is pretty much what I was gonna say:thumbup:

I like to leave windows out til the last thing, but I do cut the holes in the siding. so you have access for materials and cords and what-not
 

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I run a large crew. We race up to the roof in essence. Always have the man power to do the piddly stuff as we go as there is always going to be a lull in production here and there. Once we are roof ready we back frame for a day or so. Get everything cleaned up lower roofs on and sheeted. This way once the roofs on and sheeted, generally takes a day, we are basically done the house and can move on
 

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depends on the house/how many guys we have on it, but we generally try to finish and punch out each floor before going to the next.
 

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I prefer carpenter
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I run a large crew. We race up to the roof in essence. Always have the man power to do the piddly stuff as we go as there is always going to be a lull in production here and there. Once we are roof ready we back frame for a day or so. Get everything cleaned up lower roofs on and sheeted. This way once the roofs on and sheeted, generally takes a day, we are basically done the house and can move on
This is how we work as well, and its basically for the simple reason that around here as soon as that plywood is on the roof, if your lucky you have a day before the, HVAC, plumber , and electrician is there and then it is a nightmare
 
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