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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I'm taking carpenter training for my interprovincial red seal, and I've entered in a full on battle royal with one of my instructors on the proper use of a framing nailer. Now, you might think this is a rather technical question, but I'm also in the midst of developing my company safety manual, so I really would like to get to the bottom of this.

I was always taught, and I train young guys to bounce the nailer from the top of the plate to the bottom because the motion of your nailer hand is downward and away from your wrist and hand that are holding the twisted stud straight.

My instructors opinion is that you should put the nail in at the bottom of the plate first, then you can take your other hand completely off the stud before you put the top nail in.

Opinions? :whistling
 

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Top to bottom sounds better to me. Either way your hand will be on the stud if its twisted.
Cant say i do it consistantly one way
 

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It is a better, safer practice for new guys to learn bottom to top so can remember to remove there hand. Over time if they wanna switch it up then by all means. You just don't want a new kid learning how to respect to nailer the hard way. I would side with your instructor on this.
 

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Just keep your hand a foot back and don't shoot too high. I shot myself in the hand from nailing too high up on the plate but that was because I was trying to be a hotshot with 2 weeks of experience...

Top to bottom is definitely faster and I think the risk of shooting too high on the first shot are lower than getting carried away on your last shot (if going bottom to top).
 

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I'm just to busy to think about it now.I usually shoot bottom to top.That way you hit the bottom and can move your foot ou t of the way before shooting the top.Or adjust.
 

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....and I think the risk of shooting too high on the first shot are lower than getting carried away on your last shot (if going bottom to top).
thats why i go top to bottom. i always do stuff in the same way, that way you make the most of your time, if you go around doing things different all the time its slower and more room for mistakes, like nailing from bottom to top bouncing the gun (because last time when you went top to bottom you bounced) and then just clipping the tip and shooting a nail through your thumb bone. havent done it just saw it happen, not cool.
 

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I would say the important factor here is keeping your hand a safe distance away from the plate so the fastener can't hit it (2X fastener length).
I shot my hand once when I was grabbing the stud a foot away from the plate. Shot the nail over the top of the plate. I'm a lot more cautious since then!
 

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Was taught bottom to top so your hand is clear for the top nail in case it shoots out. That being said, I don't always do it that way anymore, but it should be something taught and instructed to new comers. I was told the reason why not to do it and after a little time with the gun soon realized it's not to be disrespected and I'm always fully conscious of when I'm doing something that could bite me and work accordingly.
 

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I can say with out a doubt that your instructor is correct. Several years ago I shot a 3.5in. Framing nail directly into the end of my thumb that went damb near to my wrist. This happened because of the nail. The enf of the nail was defective as it was shaped just like a spoon. When it entered the plate it emediatly turned and whent straight into my thumb.
 
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