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Down in Long Beach Island, New Jersey for vacation this week. A ton of work going on down here. I saw this roof and was wondering how is it done? Haven't had a chance to get close enough to see what they used, but was wondering what any of you may have used in the past. 2x12s bolted together with a mending plate? 14 or 16" LVL? Also, how do you figure out the curve, measure the dimension, etc. Just curious and impressed.
 

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water re-locater
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Make sure you hit the chicken or the egg restaurant in beach haven. Awesome wings and cheesesteaks:thumbup: Sorry dont know much about framing.
 

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Rafters pre-cut in the shop out of whatever stock is spec'd.

Sounds like you're in Loneframer country, maybe his job...:thumbsup:
 

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Griz,

Regardless of what is spec'd, what would be the preferred method? I was thinking a sheet of 3/4" plywood sandwiched with 2x12's in a manner that would allow the rafter to be say, 18" wide or whatever was needed. So the plywood would be, say 18" and the 2x12s carriage bolted through. But would this be strong enough?
 

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Griz,

Regardless of what is spec'd, what would be the preferred method? I was thinking a sheet of 3/4" plywood sandwiched with 2x12's in a manner that would allow the rafter to be say, 18" wide or whatever was needed. So the plywood would be, say 18" and the 2x12s carriage bolted through. But would this be strong enough?
That is precisely why we have & use Engineers.
 

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My profile pic is of a bell shaped roof. The long main rafters go first, these are the steep ones. The tails are just kick outs and the peak is usually very shallow and just rests on top of the others.
 

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KemoSabe
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Not a bell, but the same principle. In this case, as is the same with the bells I've seen, the rafters are two plies of 3/4" plywood. They are glued and stapled together.

The architect has specifications on the plan concerning radii, center points, etc.
 

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Our shop just did a bunch of these but much bigger for a shopping center remodel and shipped them to FL. The architect generated and gave us the pattern, specified the plywood, epoxy adhesive and screws and screw locations. The plywood was 4 x 12 marine grade doug fir. We didn't do the install.
 

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We build round stuff all the time. We generally use 3/4 inch plywood. We set up a router on a radius jig we make ourselves in a large open area of the subfloor. We router the radius pcs then glue and screw the rafters or trusses together. Sometimes if the roof is wider that 8 feet we will have maybe three sheets getting routered to make one ply of the truss. Then we change the layout of the next sheets to create staggered joints. Some of the trusses we make are six layers per truss. Kind of sucks turning radius' for days on end to create the arch trusses. We do a lot of eyebrow dormers and radius edged roofs.
 

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Framing Bell Shaped Roof

We do it in a very similar manner, but cut the plywood on the CNC, then create modular sections that are delivered to the site, bolted together and then lifted as a unit.

Here's some pictures of a job we did a year ago for a fellow CT member.

This was a "reciprocal" design that allowed for the bell shape to be maintained on the interior, without interruption by collar ties or ceiling joists.

We actually prefabbed a lot on this job, including the front entry in the last picture.

The idea is to shorten the construction schedule by prefabbing some of the complex (curved) stuff that usually slows the job to a grind.

ImageUploadedByContractorTalk1419293883.835306.jpg ImageUploadedByContractorTalk1419293923.422560.jpg ImageUploadedByContractorTalk1419293959.906451.jpg ImageUploadedByContractorTalk1419294011.922778.jpg ImageUploadedByContractorTalk1419294070.472220.jpg ImageUploadedByContractorTalk1419294110.865665.jpg ImageUploadedByContractorTalk1419294152.867141.jpg
 
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