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Hi,
i'm here for posting my first post and i hope someone will help me with this issue..i had a course in timber framing here in Sweden of 1 week the last summer,1 week is not even possible to compare with the experience that you guys have in US and Canada,but being a furnituremaker was actually not so difficult understand the joinery and the basics..but now the question;i have in mind to build my workshop and eventually a house of around 1000sqfeet with the stick framing technique,but i would like make timber framed roof trusses,could someone show me with a picture or a drawing the correct way to support these roof trusses?do you gang together 2 or 3 studs under for example?how the trusses sit on the plate and how they are attached?if would also frame a loft what's the best way for incorporate all these elements together?
thank you for the help!
 

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1) At the bearing piont in the wall, gang 4 or 5 studs together
2) the bottom cord of the truss will sit on the top plate of the wall.. If no bottom cord (vaulted truss), cut a birds mouth to bear on the plate
3) Framing a loft will require some more detail to describe, plus more info from you.. pm me if you want
 

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Why not just stick the roof? My uncle made truss for his home many years ago. By the time made the truss and put plywood gusset on both sides of all joints he could have just stick built it. I would def think about sticking the loft.
 

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Why not just stick the roof? My uncle made truss for his home many years ago. By the time made the truss and put plywood gusset on both sides of all joints he could have just stick built it. I would def think about sticking the loft.
It's most likely designed in bents. This is timber framing joinery trusses, not the kind of truss you're thinking of.
 

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sorry

It's most likely designed in bents. This is timber framing joinery trusses, not the kind of truss you're thinking of.
Yeah sorry bout that. I think I understand what you are talking bout. Couldn't tell you how online but buy me a ticket to Sweden and well figure it out.:thumbup:
 
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