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I have a 3 year old Nashua made manufactured home that's 680 square feet and it is sitting on a block foundation. If I can move the house can I use the existing foundation and add on to it to build a bigger stick house?
 

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I don't know? I'm also somewhat disappointed that one of the big boys won't answer this for you. :cheesygri I would like for you to know i did look at some manufacture homes with my nephew and some are pretty nice for the low cost. Like around here 60,000 and master with whirlpool bathtub seperate shower 3 bedrooms and then like a combo kitchen living and dining room. Hey i could live in that no problem But then i spent 20 years in airforce so a bed 3 squares pack of cigs and i'm good to go. :cheesygri I thought they were pretty nice for 60,000 dollars.
 

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Excavatingguy said:
I have a 3 year old Nashua made manufactured home that's 680 square feet and it is sitting on a block foundation. If I can move the house can I use the existing foundation and add on to it to build a bigger stick house?
You probably need to ask at your local building department. If there is no building dept then it might be a good idea to have an engineer look at it with a rough idea of what you might want to build on it. RT.
 

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If foundation is only three years old is should meet all current codes. Just beware of uncompacted backfill, bringing new foundation down to level of old is best bet. Consulting an engineer and performing soil tests is always a good idea.
 

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This guy used to post pretty regularly mikesewell
maybe you can shoot him an e-mail and see what he has to say.
 

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Exc, hell yes you can. A soil test is a good idea and the remark about getting down below fill is a must.

With three rows of bar in the footing, with filled stretcher and vertical bar 32 OC, then conecting bar 16 OC at the house, and some block mesh per row, you can dam near build next to 747's mile high office.

Bob
 

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The biggest foundation concern for a manufactured home is uplift, or, the "Wizard of Oz" effect. In constructing a home, Toto would feel more secure knowing that the aforementioned structural problem was addressed as well as a new concern properly addressed by the other thoughtful posts.

If engineered solutions are uneconomical and local code enforcement unhelpful, there are some basics you can rely on. If the soils meet code for pinning down the structure, you are on your way, but with a heavier structure your concern shifts toward settlement issues. You have to determine if your home will sit on fill or residual soil. If it rests on virgin, you can survey its bearing capacity on your own, depending on your soils classification. For example, if you cannot penetrate the soil more than three inches with a #4 re-bar, you probably have 4,000 psf soils which would support the giga-story building Glasshousebltr suggests, eh, granted with larger footings.

After consulting local code authorities, if necessary, I would consult your local geo-technical service provider. But if not required, I would employ experienced based common sense. Consult with your neighbors, who likely have the same soil conditions, for example. Just a thought or two with apologies for repeating what the others say.
 

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PipeGuy said:
This guy used to post pretty regularly mikesewell
maybe you can shoot him an e-mail and see what he has to say.
PipeGuy,
I'd say "Hi, everybody, hope that you're all doing well." Sorry that I've been AWOL, I'm really getting slammed this year, and there's no end in sight. Thanks for the plug Pipe, I miss your sense of humor.

Assuming that the soil is good, a good foundation is a good foundation, get a stamp that says so, and add what you want to it.

Best regards to all,
 

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Mr Mike Sewell,

How the hell have you been??, - - couldn't figger out what ever happened to ya, - - glad to hear from ya, - - hope all is well!!
 

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Tom R said:
Mr Mike Sewell,

How the hell have you been??, - - couldn't figger out what ever happened to ya, - - glad to hear from ya, - - hope all is well!!
Tom,
Sorry that I was MIA for so long. I've been busier than Bill Clinton at a cheerleader's convention.
Best regards,
 

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mikesewell said:
Tom,
Sorry that I was MIA for so long. I've been busier than Bill Clinton at a cheerleader's convention.
Best regards,
Hmm, - - must've gone thru a lot of cigars!! :cheesygri

We'll hold your spot, - - see ya' soon!!
 

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Probably already have your answer. just my past experiance:

One thing I have ran into with modular slabs is that they sometimes don't have a footing, so depending on your local codes you may not be able to use this with out putting a footing on the outside edge somehow. This of course is not my expertise so I won't even try to give an answer.. I have ran into this question on more than one estimate though.

good luck if you already have'nt got this done!

Flimmer
 
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