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I am building an auto body shop 60x80 and need to bring the pad up about 3'. I am planning on bringing in all the fill and compacting and wondered what everyones thoughts were on the cheapest/best foundation. It obviously will have a concrete slab and it steps down 2' at 25' in. I am more concerned as to ideas with retaining walls, piers, grade beams, and footers. Any advice is appreciated and thanks in advance.
 

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General Contractor
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What is your Architect has to say about all this? Didn't he give you a piece of paper with a drawing and there should be some wording and all kinds of numbers on it? :whistling
Not to mention "cheapest/best " don't go hand in hand. Cheap or Best...pick one :no:
 

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Thanks. It is actually a design build, where I am the designer builder. The local code only requires engineers stamp on the steel structure. Thanks again.
 

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OK, so we know there will be no storage underneath....retaining walls-you can wait on that as well....footings you will have, just how much is the question...Your local code would usually dictate how deep the footings have to be....maybe you're in Phoenix, so you won't need to go deep. In most climates you could still go monolithic, where the footings which are considerably thicker, blend in to the slab, and it is poured at once. That is probably your best "bang for buck" option.....that could be post stessed as well....but that would cost money.....You can do stem walls as well, maybe 3-4' high, with a shelf w/rebar to accept slab....You could also do piers with grade beams, either prestressed or cip.....Lotta ways to go....surprised the steel building co. doesn't have ideas....
 

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Earthworks Corporation
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I just put up a building like what you are talking about. Email me direct at www EarthworksCorporation @ yahoo . com I can forward you the engineering plan that I recieved. I think it will be what you are looking for.
 

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I strongly agree with Rockmonster, every building must be designed to meet a building code and without these building codes we would end up in bad shape like Haiti did after the devastating earthquake, cheap/best do not go hand in hand. A poorly constructed roof will collapse from snow; a poorly engineered building will not withstand heavy win loads; Poor concrete will crumble in an earthquake.
 

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Hroark -

What is the climate/location?

If you are design and build and a contractor, you are ultimately responsible for the administration AND any decisions made on the design/construction of the slab.

I am surprised you do not even have a report on the soils you plan to have dug and built on.

Depending on the site conditions and climate, a stem wall to support the steel/wrinkled tin structure and a separate floating slab inside may be preferable, since the slab is not a structural element.
 

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Florida GC
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Hroark said:
I am building an auto body shop 60x80 and need to bring the pad up about 3'. I am planning on bringing in all the fill and compacting and wondered what everyones thoughts were on the cheapest/best foundation. It obviously will have a concrete slab and it steps down 2' at 25' in. I am more concerned as to ideas with retaining walls, piers, grade beams, and footers. Any advice is appreciated and thanks in advance.
Save yourself the trouble and liability; hire an architect or engineer to design it for you. You'll sleep better.
 

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Get an Engineer. Just because local code isn't so stringent doesn't remove you from liability for any structural failures. Design build firms typically have an architecht or engineer involved. A few $ now can save $$$$$$ down the road. Retain an engineer and sleep better at night.
 

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Chuck
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What does the steel building manufacturer recommend? I've done the ground work for lots of steel buildings around here and one contractor always poured a 2' wide by 2' high grade beam around the perimeter of the building. Of course frost protection around here is only 18" to 2'.

I guess what I'm getting at is that it depends. As you are doing design build and are asking us this question I venture to say you are in over your head.
 
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