Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Contractor
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got called in on this. Foundation failure on an apartment building.

This is some of what we are dealing with.







Here is part of the solution. Needle beams, supported inside and out.









We will be continuing the excavation and removing the damaged wall.

So far we have completed the footing for the wall that supports the steel beams, provided a drainage trench so the area did not fill up with rain and snow melt.

Started the dig below the beams yesterday, will finish up the dig next week. The engineer will evaluate the existing footing to see if it is suitable to rebuild upon. Then the rebuild... :)

I love this type of project. :D
 

·
General Contractor
Joined
·
8,051 Posts
I got called in on this. Foundation failure on an apartment building.

This is some of what we are dealing with.
Interesting job, nice excavation work as always. Keep the pictures coming please :thumbsup:
 

·
Vagitarian
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
What caused the failure ?? I don't not see any dur-o-wall or rebar in the orginal foundation.
 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What caused the failure ?? I don't not see any dur-o-wall or rebar in the orginal foundation.
The official cause is hydrostatic pressure. The story I got was a groundhog burrowed under the patio, we had a heavy rain event last fall and an abundance of water found it's way into the groundhog's den and blam-o that was that.

We demo-ed most of the damaged wall today, and you are correct. There is no reinforcement of any kind.
These buildings were constructed in the late 60's or early 70's, I guess that was standard practice back then. :rolleyes:



cleveman said:
Is that a full course of block on top of the basement slab?
It appears so, I did not really notice that before, I will look closer and see. That would be another issue that contributed to the failure.


morning wood said:
That looks like my nightmare. Glad you have the job.
It's not so bad, slow and steady....I did appreciate a small break from running the skid loader mid afternoon, I got to break up some of the wall with a sledge hammer. That helped me get my mind right. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,213 Posts
Now ...That is interesting.... most I've ever done is a helical coil lift on a one story resi....

Keep the pic's and explanation coming......

Maybe no big deal to you.... but I sure find it interesting...Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,836 Posts
There must have been millions of basements built that way, with no reinforcement in the walls. That alone wasn't a big problem. It can become a big problem however when water is not kept away from the walls.

That is what causes the horizontal cracking and bowing in of the walls.

Not having the walls held out by the slab, however, will allow the entire wall to move in and I think that is what you are looking at.

There were a lot of things done to keep the walls strong, such as pilasters, recessed entries, planters, window wells, interior walls and even shower stalls. Of course a simple jog in the wall could be used as well. With bit of planning, and the size of homes built then, there is no reason to have a wall over 12' long.
 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Update:

We finished the dig and removal of the existing structure. The Engineer is going to examine the footing and soil to determine if additional work must be done prior to rebuilding the wall.

Some pics:









The columns were installed by others at the time of the wall failure, we did not disturb them, even though the temporary shoring wall was in place.




 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Looks like it is staying pretty dry
Frozen is dry....until it melts. :D

We had to dig the frost off, each day, as we worked.

As far as the normal site conditions, it is not a "wet" area, and that is not what caused the failure.

It is probably pretty wet today, the 12+ inches of snow, since we finished the dig, is melting away.
 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Back on this project again. Lot's of delays due to things way out of my control, but we applied some sheet membrane to the foundation a few weeks ago and this week placed a couple tubes to support the terraces above.

The steel beams are to be removed next week, then we can start to fill and compact.







We are installing dimple board along the foundation, as well as draintile to daylight. We will install the rest of the membrane as we back fill.
 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The steel beams were removed earlier this week and we started the backfill phase.





This is the detail the architect provided for backfilling, a 1' column of #57 stone wrapped in filter fabric. :rolleyes:



Our method to try and contain the stone fill while being able to compact the soil. Plywood panels with the filter fabric lining the inside, we would backfill along the outside, add about 1' of stone in the panel, raise the panels, compact the soil, repeat the process.



Filled to an elevation that will allow the masons to complete the repairs to the brick veneer, once they are done, we'll finish the filling and grading.

 

·
Vagitarian
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
Tom, I notice the downspouts on the front of the building. Were they originally piped underground out to daylight or did they dump on the ground. Most likely part of the problem.

Also, will you be extending these downspouts out to daylight underground ?
 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
The downspouts did have some piping attached, it was not adequate in my opinion.

We will be burying pipe and extending to daylight, probably around the corner of the building, the grade slopes pretty fast along the left side, it is walkout in the back.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top