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Does anybody have or know if there are any forms for estimating specific jobs, i.e. for entry door installation it would have check boxes for left hand or right hand swing, size and number of hinges, lock set style, deadbolt etc...

I do alot of different types of jobs and I always seem to forget something I need when I go out to look at a job.

I am trying to get more organised, also does anybody have a check list for tools for specific jobs, the door example from above: chisels, saw horses, router, lock bore set, pwr planer
etc...

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Bruce Hawkins
 

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Hate to sound negative, but I doubt a form drawn up by someone else from Anytown, USA would work for your situation in your area.

If you do all types of work, (at least old work, that is), and it sounds like you do, - - then you already know there's almost no such thing as doing the same job twice.

Best thing to do is make your own.

And, - - get a bigger truck.
 

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...jammin
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Tonkadad said:
I do alot of different types of jobs and I always seem to forget something I need when I go out to look at a job.

I am trying to get more organised, also does anybody have a check list for tools for specific jobs, the door example from above: chisels, saw horses, router, lock bore set, pwr planer
etc...
Not a list per say, but my small van has limited room
I have organized my tools by general job type
Some stay in the van at all times
It took a while to figure out which ones
Others sort of rotate
If I know for sure I can pull a bin out for the day, and I need room for some other occasional use tool/bag/bucket/box I'll switch them
 

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Here's a check-list I recently made for myself for bathroom re-modeling, - - more of a 'job' form than a 'tool' form, - - but you get the idea.
 

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I have several check lists for items for specific jobs. They are posted right by the door in my shop. I got tired of the boys loading up and heading out and then getting a call an hour later saying they forgot to grab something. Now, when they are given a workorder, they can check BEFORE they leave the shop to see if they have everything they will need for the jobsite. I seperate ones for wallpaper removal, wallpaper install (1 for res., 1 for comm.), painting, decks, etc. Maybe sometime next week I will enter them onto a Word doc and post them.

I also have one for our job boxes, like an inventory list. The boxes are checked everytime they come in or out of the shop. so if we ever run out of tape, or sandpaper, it can be restocked before I lose time on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the responses. PWG, exactly nothing more frustrating then getting to a job and realizing you forgot the whatchamacallit.
 

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Tom we run the same rigs, I only wish that there was more room in the last compartment A little wider would be nice.
A hey whats with that dead space on the inside where the body ends and rear wall is, I could never figure that out.
Next year I am going to replace a 2001 and I am going with a 14 ft body with dualies.

BJD
 

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Tom,

We have been looking into buying one of those trucks. Do you think it would be good for a painting company? I got the impression that it would be perfect for a plumber or an electrition.
 

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I think it's an excellent truck for any trade, - - it does seem almost like an absolute necessity for electricians, plumbers, handymen, and 'all-type' home improvement guys like myself, - - that need to carry any number of tools and materials.

Seems like with painting it would be handy, too, - - nothin' better than having the 'paint-store' right out in the customer's driveway.

One thing I can guarantee you, - - when and if you do get a truck like this, - - you'll wonder how you ever survived without it.

They usually come in 10'-6", 12'-6", or 14'-6" long boxes, - - and with choices of 6' or 7' heights. Mine is the 10'-6" length and the 7' height, - - my last one was the 12'-6" length, - - but I find this one more comfortable to drive around town and easier to park at the customers homes. It's not so big they mind it being in their driveway.

One of your other choices are with or without the toolbox doors and bins, - - you can probably save a couple thousand 'without' them, - - but I think it's well worth it to spend the extra bucks now, - - to be able to access tools and such from the outside. The outside boxes on mine also have sliding doors on the inside so you can access from either in or out.

Next choice would be an overhead rear door or 'swing' doors, - - I've got the two swing doors, - - seem easier to open and less upkeep.

Another option is the 'dualie' wheels on the back, - - which I doubt you would be carrying all that much weight for them to be necessary.

You'll need racks on top, - - and preferably a 'built-on' ladder on the back for access. Keep in mind the distance between cross-rails on the racks is directly proportional to the size of the truck.

Mine also has an access sliding door from the box to the cab, - - which I rarely use to go through, - - but it's handy to open it up for carrying 12' boards or a 24' ladder without having to go to the trouble of tying it up top.

Hope this helps, - - gotta go!! :Thumbs:
 

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No problem, Pro

It's a Chevy Vortec 6000 V-8, - - with a 'Grumann-Olsen' Body

It was their last 'Grumann-Olsen' bodied truck in stock, - - they had already started switching over to 'Supreme' bodies (a money thing, I'm sure)

I bought it brand new (2003), - - right off the lot (actually they had enough choices on the lot there was no need to order one)

I got a really decent deal on it (because of the discontinued 'body-box' manufacturer, - - and I've got 'family' in GM)

It originally went for about $36,000, - - I paid $30,000, - - no money down, - - though I decided to pay for the tax and tags, - - 0% financing, - - making my payments an even $500/mo.

I look at it as the just part of the cost of doing business, - - I can't even begin to say how much time (and therefore, money) it has saved me in not having to make those pesky trips to the hardware store or lumber yard.

Damn thing is like a hardware store.

Here's a pic of the inside.
 

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ProWallGuy said:
Tom, you damn near sold me on one of those trucks. Do you mind telling what you had to cough up to buy it? Was it new, and built to your specs, or did you find it used? Chevy? Size motor? Etc etc.
Inquiring minds want to know.
A friend(electrician) of mine just bought the 14 foot model and he built the floor up on 2x(?)'s and then plywood. He sectioned it off and he slides his extension ladder , tall step ladder (14') and pipe right in. He obviously has the roll-up door for full access but I thought it was a sweet set up and really saves a lot of room. I know you have taller ladders but it might help organize a little if you decide to make the plunge. He also was talking about the space he has that overhangs above the cab as an option that he is really happy with. Plus, they make deflectors for it to help with wind resistance.

He bought the Ford with duallies and diesal.
 

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It's hard to see in the picture, - - but the sliding door is behind that portable table saw. Although they're in the closed position, - - I think you can see the sliding doors that access the supplies in the outside bins. Oh, yeah, - - and the three lights up top are handy, too.

The painted gray wooden shelves I built, and have actually added more since, - - this pic was taken pretty much about a month or so after I got the truck. I ran eye-hooks down the length of both shelves, - - so it's always convenient to bungee anything down.

4 X 8 sheets of plywood slide right in on the flat.
 

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DGR,IABD
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I run trucks very similar to Tom's, except probably twice as expensive. I run totally aluminium Utilimaster walk in trucks that have been specially upfit for electrical work. They are around 48-50K, with one that I own came in just under 75K with all the extras. These are basically million mile bodies, with 250-300,000 mile engines and transmissions. I expect these trucks to be on the road for 25-30 years, and some already have 10 years on them. The oldest one is due for a paint job and relettering soon. I find duallies necessary in my business. If nothing else, it lets you limp around for the rest of the day with a flat on the back and still get your work done.
 

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mdshunk said:
I run trucks very similar to Tom's, except probably twice as expensive. I run totally aluminium Utilimaster walk in trucks that have been specially upfit for electrical work. They are around 48-50K, with one that I own came in just under 75K with all the extras. These are basically million mile bodies, with 250-300,000 mile engines and transmissions. I expect these trucks to be on the road for 25-30 years, and some already have 10 years on them. The oldest one is due for a paint job and relettering soon. I find duallies necessary in my business. If nothing else, it lets you limp around for the rest of the day with a flat on the back and still get your work done.
Md, - - we don't believe you :cheesygri

Seriously though, - - they sound great, - - how about some pics??

And how'd you get the flat tire??, - - was there broken glass on the sidewalk?? :cheesygri
 
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