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I'm a framing contractor, but I have agreed to help with a cinderblock garage project. The footing got poured at sunset on friday night, and come monday the cement is 3 inches out of level (40 ft X 30 ft) from one corner to the other. Its a 12 in X 24 in footing, with 10 inch block wall to be built on top. How should the footing be made level? Ready-mix three inches thick? Mega-thick mortar bed? If we pour more ready-mix in to level it out, does it have to be full width, or will 10-12 inches wide do it? Any help greatly appreciated.
 

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Wow!! THREE DAMN INCHES!! Can't say I know the best fix, - - but to think I get pissed of if it's out more than a 1/2" over that distance.

Myself, - - rather than have some damn 'patch', - - I think I would go ahead and 'dry-lay' 30' (or whatever) worth of blocks on their sides with a 'mortar-space' in between and snap a chalk line from 0" to 3", - - and then break out the mask, glasses, ear protection, and the cut-off saw.
 

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Three inches! :eek: I know it sounds like preaching , but I never would do a footing without shooting elevations. I would just repour another footing on top.
 

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I'd call the contractor back, it's not your problem.
 

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Tom R said:
What, - - nobody likes my 'cave-man' method?? :cheesygri
If I were 20 years younger...I don't like to get my clothes all dusty anymore :cheesygri
Here's one for you. I own a rental property and had to replace the front foundation wall. The place is a duplex and the owner of the other half that caused the problem (long story) is out there replacing his side. Me, after knocking out the foundation I calculate distance from mud sill to bottom of footing. Him, digs a footing, pours and just starts laying. He gets to the top and he's out there with the saw cutting 12" block down to various heights along the wall. Until then I had never seen a 12" block that was only 1" high!!!
 

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Log you got a lousy pour on the footing. I think if it were mine i would just cut and fit the first course of block and cuss the concrete guy with each one. Once you are past the first course you should be home free. Renting or borrowing a 12" gas powered cut off saw with a diamond blade would help a lot. Good luck
R
 

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Go back to post 6. It is not YOUR problem.
 

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I like Bob's method, even without the keyway, drill some rebar into the footing and spray on an additive to improve adhesion of the curb you'll form up that IS level. Rich.
 

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do like the egyptians dig underneath the high side until it falls down level,ONLY KIDDING,clearly unacceptable work :eek:
 

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RJS said:
...just cut and fit the first course of block and cuss the concrete guy with each one.
This one gets my vote. :Thumbs:
 

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You figure out your height that you want to get to, then come down to the lowest part of the footing. Figure out what you will need for a starter rip from your block and level that over. I usuall lay all the block out to bond and use a chalk box and snap a line. So your rips will all be thickest on the low end and skinniest on the high end. That should solve your problem. Lay your block the way your normally would then because your first course should be level.

edit:
I didnt see TomR's reply :cheesygri Actually the same thing. Alot of times the wall height doesnt match perfectly anyways so you need to put rips on the first course and get dirty no matter what.
 

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If you are coming off with a wood plate, do the same thing, stair stepping up to grade. I am no engineer, but I would then dry-pack non-shrink grout under the bottom plate of my wood framing.

If you are coming up with masonry, it's easy. Just tell the mason to "handle it", lol, and sign his extra work order.

The best thing to do is to have your foundation contractor tear out his mistake and replace it.
 

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If you are a contractor, or employed in the building trades, and are looking for assistance, a new thread is your best bet.

None of those guys are around anymore.
 
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