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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
when laying hardwood flooring my understanding is that flooring should be laid at 90 degrees to floor joist.is this required with floating floors also with 3/4"plywood t-g subfloors being much stiffer than boarded subfloors is possible to run nail down floors parallel to joist.
 

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"Floating floors" offer no structural value what-so-ever, so IMHO you can orient it any way you please, 90 deg....in line....diagonal...even standing on edge :) ...well ok maybe not that last one, but I would say any way that you like the look of it, go for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thats what i was thinking ,current job may have radiant heat under wood subfloor with floating no worries about nailing thru tubeing runs.
 

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jp has it right. Don't depend on any 'floating flooring' for structural use, it was never designed for this.
 

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BTW Berg,

You do nail "floating" floors, but only on the edges. I.E. - only the first piece and the last peice. <--official comment

Now then, I have done a floor without edge nailing it(due to an abundance of concrete below it...and a lack of tools to do anything about it), and it turned out ok. Still hasn't moved after a couple years. <---unofficial comment :cheesygri
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not sure i understand edge nailing floating floor. Isn,t this only done with glue down floors.When i say floating i am refering to clic and edge glued laminate and engineered floors.
 

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Floating means non-secured.
 

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Floating, in all instructions I've read, means minimally secured (nailed on the edges). But like I said I've done it both ways with no problems.
 

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jp, we must be talking about different systems. The 'floating' flooring that I install requires an open perimeter to allow the product to expand and contract with variations in temp. and humidity. Securing the perimeter would cause the product to buckle or open seams.
 

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Correct. Floating floor means floating. I have read alot of stuff. I have yet to see any recommendations that involve nailing the primeter of a floating install.
 
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