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My brother just bought a house that was built in the late 1800s and is compleetly remodeling it. The second story floor joist were sagging about 3 inches in the center of a 14'x18' room and the inspector told him he would have to install 2x10s on 8 inch centers. I'm thinking this is a little overkill but this isn't my line of work so I wanted to ask others who might know. What is the typical size limber used for this span(14') and what spacing is used. There is going to be a bathroom on this floor if that makes a difference.

I'm just a remodeler (flooring, painting, some finish work, exc.) so This is a little out of my league but I would think 2x10s on 12" or 2x12s on 16" centers would be plenty.
 

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mikesewell said:
Show the inspector the span tables in your code book.
He did that but his code book is from 1998. The inspector told him his book was out of date and the code had changed but didn't offer proof from a more current book. My brother isn't a contractor so he didn't want to invest in all new and current books(I don't have them either because I don't do work on that scale). I guess what I'm asking is does this sound right or should he invest in a newer book and prove the inspector wrong. The savings in lumber would pay for the book if he was right. Also, does anyone have a link to where he could purchase code books? Thanks for any help you have to offer.

The house is in macon georgia.
 

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That one would be new to me. How ever over 13' 7" I believe for No.2 or better is 12" on center. Select lumber you probably could go 16" on center.

Try google for the code books but expext to pay around seventy dollars. Make sure he gets the ICBO book.
 

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Since 14' is the most common apartment bedroom size, we must have joisted a few thousand with 2x10 16"oc. 2& btr D.F. I don't know anything about your area though...

He IS tearing out the old ones, right?
 

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Rusty Nails said:
He IS tearing out the old ones, right?

He has already taken out the old ones and the roof is being supported by jacks. He will be putting in new ones this weekend. I'll see if i can get a newer code book from one of the GCs at a job I'm currently working to look at. Thanks for the examples.
 

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mighty anvil said:
For dimensioned lumber (2x8 thru 2x12) @ 16" o.c. (not 12" o.c. which is not a good idea when trying to limit bounce) for ALL floors the following methods give the same results:
Say what?? Have you ever walked on a 12" o.c. floor let alone a 8" o.c. I have never had bounce with those oc's
 

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mighty anvil said:
It is always better, in terms of bounce avoidance, to go to a deeper joist rather than to go to a closer spacing. It should only be done when a deeper joist is not possible.

I have had plans that spanned 2x12's 20 feet and those had to be 12" oc I don't think there was any bounce. My deck out back is 24" oc and that mofo has some bounce.
 

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The I-joists i use have recommended deflections of at least L/480 for residential floors and L/600 for commercial floors.Span tables for L/360 are in the manual but are not the preferred method.
 

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You gave me. You ever heard of google or do you work for awc?
Your the one trying to convince me you get less bounce with 16" oc. I am still not convinced. Considering even the 2x6 floors I built were L480
 
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