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hack of all trades
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there any advantage to using x bracing between floor joists rather than blocking? The first guy I ever worked for had us hand nailing these x braces that kept splitting and insisted on that over blocking. None of us had any experience and he had no frkin idea what he was doing. I have still only done minimal framing on projects here and there so I don't know much about why things are/were done a certain way.
 

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KemoSabe
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Personally, I prefer X-bridging. Blocking is fine too, but I like the fact that x bridging is unaffected by cupped joists, is much easier to get a tight connection and it actually tightens up as joists shrink. I use 1x3 pine with 2" medium crown staples to prevent splitting.
 
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hack of all trades
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Personally, I prefer X-bridging. Blocking is fine too, but I like the fact that x bridging is unaffected by cupped joists, is much easier to get a tight connection and it actually tightens up as joists shrink. I use 1x3 pine with 2" medium crown staples to prevent splitting.
That's something I never thought about. I suppose running conduit and smaller utilities parallel without drilling is a slight advantage too.

That was a good experiment... when I searched this topic I didn't see that one.
 

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diplomat
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That was a cool experiment. Thread was before I found this site. At first I found myself wishing I had been around to offer my opinion (I always have many) but then the thread got out of control, so it's all for the best.
 

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Most builder I work for we cut 2x3 bridging and gets nailed with 2 1/4 nails 2 per end. Lumber yards don't stock bridging precut in 2x3 only 2x2. Just have a guy on the chop saw making some dust. I personally think solid blocking has more chances of squeaking. We glue the odd sized blocks in to help prevent this.
 

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KemoSabe
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That's something I never thought about. I suppose running conduit and smaller utilities parallel without drilling is a slight advantage too.

That was a good experiment... when I searched this topic I didn't see that one.
This is a good point. Most other trades will beat a block out before drilling through it.

The electricians and plumbers appreciate x rather than blocks.
 

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Design Build
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http://www.strongtie.com/ftp/catalogs/c-2013/C-2013-p206.pdf

I have used plenty of these with a positive placement nailer during new construction.

Nail only the tops prior to subflooring. Then when the house is mostly complete (sufficiently loaded), go under (basement/crawl space/whatever) and nail-off the bottoms.

If its on a remodel, the ones that bite into the sides would be used. I have never tried those.

I've done solid blocking with tons of glue to boot. Other trades would just knock them out of their way. X-bracing works in those instances.
 

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General Contractor
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With blocking there is more chances to have squeaky floors, unless you glue the hell out of them like some carpenters do.

Cross bracing is the best way to go.
 

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KemoSabe
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I used metal strap bridging for years and was never happy with the results, except for the drive in type that gives the same benefit of wood X in regards to joist shrinkage.

With the top/bottom nailed straps, we would toe nail them and when plucked, they would have a high pitched ring. Within a few weeks of the joists drying out and with just minor shrinkage, the ring was gone and there was slop in the straps.

When a point load is applied above, such as an island with a stone top, there is very little load sharing benefit from the straps. The joists immediately under the load deflect substantially before the straps are tensioned and start spreading weight to other joists.

Properly installed wood X bridging tightens as the joists shrink, to the degree that I've seen the bottom of the joists get a slight crook in them from the bridging. When a point load is applied above, there is no deflection of the joists before load sharing occurs.
 

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loneframer said:
I used metal strap bridging for years and was never happy with the results, except for the drive in type that gives the same benefit of wood X in regards to joist shrinkage. With the top/bottom nailed straps, we would toe nail them and when plucked, they would have a high pitched ring. Within a few weeks of the joists drying out and with just minor shrinkage, the ring was gone and there was slop in the straps. When a point load is applied above, such as an island with a stone top, there is very little load sharing benefit from the straps. The joists immediately under the load deflect substantially before the straps are tensioned and start spreading weight to other joists. Properly installed wood X bridging tightens as the joists shrink, to the degree that I've seen the bottom of the joists get a slight crook in them from the bridging. When a point load is applied above, there is no deflection of the joists before load sharing occurs.
Same here, the last new house I built I used metal for the first time and they suck... Never again.
 

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Yeah, but who wants to lay that sh!t? Shades of the old Redex days.
 

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diplomat
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I like laying 1 1/8, super flat, easy to pound T&G together, dropping a 2x6 from a floor above doesn't put a hole in it. I've always used a lift for upper floors though.
 
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