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Kowboy
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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I stopped in to my neighbor's gut remodel yesterday. We're about 6 feet above sea level and Robert's Bay is about 150 feet away. I'd never seen this base-flush-with-the-drywall detail before. The cabinet installer said he believed it was a new code requirement, instituted at the behest of the insurance companies, to prevent drywall wicking and subsequent mold in a flood. This may be silly, as with the right storm surge on Siesta Key, the water could be at our ceilings.

I'm assuming baseboard covers the gap between the filler and drywall? Has anyone seen this previously?
 

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Radical Basement Dweller
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25,833 Posts
I did something kind of similar a number of years ago at two beach properties that had flooded.
I cut the drywall out 9" from the floor....secured 1/2" pvc spacers on the studs and then put pvc, ripped to 10" and profiled at the top to cover the opening. So basically a 10" high pvc baseboard.

This was done on interior walls in a first floor, partially finished area. All exterior walls were unfinished block.
 

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Licensed Building & A/C Contractor
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31 Posts
Im also a licensed Florida contractor. I haven’t heard of any code changes requiring this setup. On the other hand, I hope your neighbor is not paying too much for that “quality work”. That outside corner cut is way off and the piece of base in the opening looks to be about 1/4” higher than the piece next to it.


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Punching above his weight
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10,731 Posts
This is a thing, huh?

I haven't seen it yet. Do you use a 1/2 base, or do two layers of rock?
Looks like an outrageous pain in the ass.
 

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Premium Member
Honolulu, Hawaii
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18,239 Posts
That pic the OP posted isn't going to do anything for flood damage. Still going to need to replace the bottom of the wall along with mold problems that come with flooding. I guess the inset baseboard is a thing, I haven't seen it here yet. I don't do much in high end customs. I seem to stay on the house farms.
 
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Artist and not a curator
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12,870 Posts
It's a "look" that got popular in the "Beach chiq modern" turd category about 3 or 4 years ago. This is what I was talking about people doing that they say they want it to look like "not expensive" but make it very expensive. And ugly.

The one's I've done it's double rocked, 1/2" and 1/4". A laser has to be shot on all the bottoms and they have to be perfect or your base looks retarded. It's supposed to have a 1/2"×1/2" squared cove cut in the top to look like a relief channel. The drywallers are the real heroes here, not the trim carpenter (they have to be pretty good too). The houses I've worked on with it have a level 5 finish and it better be quality or it shows up. I believe the bottom for the drywall to die into is a vinyl stop.

I asked why 2 layers and they said it actually had something to do with finishing being easier. On one of the walls they had to meet a fire rating as well and somehow got the 2 hr from both sides having a total of 1-1/2" of type x.

Lots of floor scribing. The problem is some people think it's easy but it is outrageously expensive to do right. People think they can go in and do whatever like any ole regular house. It doesn't work like that and you end up having to guess as to why someone would make something look so ****ty. When done correctly it actually looks kinda slick. When not done correctly it looks terrible.

People amaze me with the dumb **** they do but if he's by Robert's Bay, they are constantly trying to keep up with the real money on Casey Key and Siesta Key. Seen it plenty on plenty of island homes with tall Florida basements and they're well above the 14' required for living space. It's not a code requirement.

Tell your neighbor he's been had. There is zero ways to make it not look terrible if the prep wasn't done before hand. That cove isnt even cut out which is essential to make the design come together. That was really poorly executed.
 
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