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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do any of the box stores sell a generic shelf bracket where you can drill your own holes or router into a piece of wood?
 

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Possibly Woodcraft, or buy something from Ikea and sacrifice the rest of it.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I like the rockler ones. I have two 30" shelves.

Looking at installation, I'm surprised they call out 2.5" into stud given wiring. What if it's only a 2x3? Lol.
Marketing dept and product compliance dept didn't communicate.
 

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The old way to do this is to get 1/2 or 5/8 steel round bar and drill into the studs 3” and matching holes in shelf. Have to be very accurately perpendicular on all drill holes. Try and locate electric runs in wall so there’s no woopsies.


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Much easier to buy the kit, 5/8 tubular welded to 3/16 or 1/4 plate with 2 rows of screw holes 1/2" apart, shelf is 2" thick with routed space for plate. 14x 2 1/4 screws

Shelf came in 2 colors, 21,24,27,30,36 wide shelf

who ever made them did a great job and thought of everything
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Much easier to buy the kit, 5/8 tubular welded to 3/16 or 1/4 plate with 2 rows of screw holes 1/2" apart, shelf is 2" thick with routed space for plate. 14x 2 1/4 screws

Shelf came in 2 colors, 21,24,27,30,36 wide shelf

who ever made them did a great job and thought of everything
I could definitely appreciate the flanged plate with hole options. I didnt see anything for a 30" shelve, I was thinking a 24" bracket would suffice. I almost bought a couple of pair from Lowes but they were sold out. Plan was to use the hardware and ditch the offered material.

Did you have a product recommendation?
 

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Greetings All.

Twenty six + years as an installer of drapery, blinds, art, framed mirrors, + + +, and even floating shelves, & I never thought to look for brackets anywhere but the box the shelves came in. Bravo to the resourceful ones.

Other thoughts--
1. Plan ahead. If you're building the shelves, know where the studs are first so you can place the holes accordingly.
2. Use 1/2" - 5/8" lag screws into studs & cut heads off after they've screwed in. As far as strength it's overkill, but the shelves just seem to hold better with larger diameter. Screws should insert into shelves about 3/4 of the shelf depth.
3. The advantage of having all the rods on 1 metal strip is that you have a little side to side shift by drilling new holes if needed to hit studs. If you hit 1 stud near the center, put a hollow wall anchor near each end.
4. If the shelf is thick enough (top surface to bottom surface), you could use a flange for 1/4" to 3/8" pipe with a short piece of pipe screwed in. You might have to trim the flanges to create a straight edge top & bottom. You'd have to route out the shelf to fit flush to the wall. This is also easy to tighten or loosen a screw or shim to fine tune leveling.
5. NEVER let the support rods slope down away from the wall. A very slight slope up away from the wall can compensate for weight on shelf.
6. There might be some shelves that come with a cleat support. That might be ok if it locks in, but I wouldn't use a cleat (French or otherwise) because one slight bump & down comes shelf.

There are a couple of quick thoughts that might help. Happy hanging.

Eddie
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm already regretting doing this. Couple hundred dollars for two little shelves without the wood and it's not worth it.

Cut the shelves to size one and three quarter inch butcher block located by center points for three quarter inch pipe 6 in deep and after analyzing all my options I realized I was going to have a problem after a half inch keeping it straight and progressive inside.

I didn't waste too much time before I brought it to the lumber yard that has a millwork shop and let them do it on the drill press. Come back later go back later they don't have it, go back in the morning we didn't get to it come at 1:00, so at 1:00 sorry we're working on it

Come back at 3:30 on a holiday weekend oh sorry the drill press broke. We won't have it for another week at least. I'm going away for the week now and even if I get it back I'm going to have to then pour out the plate and drill in the steel at the stud locations where they don't line up.

Always something in this line of work that's why it sucks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm already regretting doing this. Couple hundred dollars for two little shelves without the wood and it's not worth it.

Cut the shelves to size one and three quarter inch butcher block located by center points for three quarter inch pipe 6 in deep and after analyzing all my options I realized I was going to have a problem after a half inch keeping it straight and progressive inside.

I didn't waste too much time before I brought it to the lumber yard that has a millwork shop and let them do it on the drill press. Come back later go back later they don't have it, go back in the morning we didn't get to it come at 1:00, so at 1:00 sorry we're working on it

Come back at 3:30 on a holiday weekend oh sorry the drill press broke. We won't have it for another week at least. I'm going away for the week now and even if I get it back I'm going to have to then pour out the plate and drill in the steel at the stud locations where they don't line up.

Always something in this line of work that's why it sucks.
 

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I would have used a router bit to cut a half circle into the wood and then face glue them together to get a perfectly centered hole.
 

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An idea for Tom M's problem. I haven't actually done this, but it worked in my head. Because I'm usually the last trade to come in (hanging drapery, pics, etc.), I assume that everything I do has to be right the first time. That makes me think things all the way through a couple of times before starting.

There's a drill accessory called Port-a-line. "Introduced in 1974, The drill guide converted a portable electric drill into a simple drill press. It was sold by Sears as the Craftsman drill guide...." (from VintageMachinery.org | Welcome). Something similar at Portable Drill Guide | Rockler Woodworking and Hardware .Also at least 10 different ones on Amazon ranging from $30 to $400, For an original Port-a-line, look on e-bay.

If you have have access to a woodworking bench vice, clamp a piece of "2 X" on either side of your shelf to create a larger flat surface to stabilize the base of the drill guide. Just be sure the boards are all flush. You might even find a way to fasten the drill guide base to the extra boards so it can't slip.

This might create a drilling surface that's awkwardly high. I learned a long time ago that when precision is critical, getting your body in the optimal position is a necessary part of the process. Use a stepstool or ladder to get above the surface you're drilling so gravity is working for you.

I suppose clamping flat on a workbench & drilling horizontally could work, but that puts you fighting gravity with the drill/guide assembly.

I think I'd use a Forstner bit, at least to start the hole if it's not long enough to finish it.

I think I would test this method first, substituting a scrap board where the actual shelf would go in the vice.

I hope this idea helps or that you can adapt it to your situation. Like I said, I haven't done this, but I think it will work.

Best wishes, Eddie
 

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Hey, one more thought.

The Woodcraft brackets shown above (tubes welded on a strip) are great for shelves NOT intended to hold much weight. No matter how well the strip is screwed to the wall, the critical factor is how much weight is leveraging the bottom edge of the strip into the sheetrock. With a lot of weight, in time, the shelf will start to tip down away from the wall. That's where the steel rod or headless lag screw comes in. All the support comes from the studs.

Wow, do I overthink things! What a nerd! :geek:

Eddie
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yeah you over thought that Eddie lol

Thanks for your thinking though.

I did consider one of those drill attachment guides, I even toyed with my door mortising jig but I couldn't find something to insert into the exist one inch bore guide to use a 3/4 bit

I planned On a long skinny installers bit shimmed on a flat table drilled horizontal with a square keeping it straight. From there I figured the hole is straight to progress incrementally to reach my size.

Like I said I ended up punting this part to go look at other work and do a exterior repair from the storm.
 
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