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I was wondering what tricks you guys use to support a floating seat in a shower? The seat would be made out of slab material and will be supported by the tile in one corner. The other side has no support. The seat would be about 4' long. The client dose not want to see any type of bracket or corbel. Thanks for the help.
 

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You need to mount something in the wall that will support the marble. Some sort of rod sticking out. The marble will have to be thick enough to be drilled from the back, or slotted below and still be strong enough.
 

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I'm guessing it will need some type of stainless steel frame because a 4' wide pc of granite or worse marble may snap with 1 or 2 people sitting on it. I know they embed rods in it for problem areas. Did you talk to you granite people?
12" deep seems to be too small for a bench.
 

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If only had one side and the back.....I would cut a deep pocket into the studs on both walls, and then block between the studs over and under the slab (thereby trapping the slab and giving it lots of strength.

Because it is penetrating the waterproofing layer, I would Tenax (epoxy) the portion of the stone that is mortised, fully membrane the "pocket" into the framing......(pitch it well) and then Kerdi-Fix the living Bejeezus out of it.

I would personally never rely on wall tile to support a bench....maybe some do, I just wouldn't.

I do it all the time (fully floating seats).....but never on a slab that big. Not saying I wouldn't, just haven't. On a slab that long with the "unsupported" corner, I would probably set a rod into that end like someone above mentioned......but drilling a precise deep hole in granite may be a biatch. I've done it with floating stone mantels, and the epoxy plus long thin stainless strips can be used to achieve a precise final set in an otherwise slightly sloppy hole.



2pts!
 

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0) Talk with the customer about budget. All these options cost significantly more, which is why you don't commonly see them.
1) Make it a thick floating box. Install T's into the wall, running up and down the studs, the base of the T sticking out into the box. Build the box around the T's, veneer with your material. At 4' long, a 3" thick floating seat will look much better than a 1" seat.
2) Cantilever slab out of wall. The wall needs to be thick enough to allow a deep recess. The slab needs to be strong enough not to snap. If you use a thin slab, wire rods will keep it from falling when it snaps.
3) Tell the client they can't have what they want, that with a seat that long you need corbels or other supports.
4) Combination of 1 and 3.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If only had one side and the back.....I would cut a deep pocket into the studs on both walls, and then block between the studs over and under the slab (thereby trapping the slab and giving it lots of strength.

Because it is penetrating the waterproofing layer, I would Tenax (epoxy) the portion of the stone that is mortised, fully membrane the "pocket" into the framing......(pitch it well) and then Kerdi-Fix the living Bejeezus out of it.

I would personally never rely on wall tile to support a bench....maybe some do, I just wouldn't.

I do it all the time (fully floating seats).....but never on a slab that big. Not saying I wouldn't, just haven't. On a slab that long with the "unsupported" corner, I would probably set a rod into that end like someone above mentioned......but drilling a precise deep hole in granite may be a biatch. I've done it with floating stone mantels, and the epoxy plus long thin stainless strips can be used to achieve a precise final set in an otherwise slightly sloppy hole.



2pts!
Notching the studs has been brought up. I really worry about the barrier. The showers all have body sprays so the water will have lots of velocity. I agree about the drilling too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
0) Talk with the customer about budget. All these options cost significantly more, which is why you don't commonly see them.
1) Make it a thick floating box. Install T's into the wall, running up and down the studs, the base of the T sticking out into the box. Build the box around the T's, veneer with your material. At 4' long, a 3" thick floating seat will look much better than a 1" seat.
2) Cantilever slab out of wall. The wall needs to be thick enough to allow a deep recess. The slab needs to be strong enough not to snap. If you use a thin slab, wire rods will keep it from falling when it snaps.
3) Tell the client they can't have what they want, that with a seat that long you need corbels or other supports.
4) Combination of 1 and 3.
The budget is not a consideration, and I tried talking the designer into support walls. She didn't like that idea.
 

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The budget is not a consideration, and I tried talking the designer into support walls. She didn't like that idea.
I wouldnt worry about the water as long as you do it right.

Like I said....I seal any stone that will sit within the pocket with a good 1/16-1/8" of Tenax (just as an extra precaution).

Then, I basically wrap the interior of the pocket as if it were a niche. i actually do it on the slab and leave 3" "tails" protruding out that I will then lap my Kerdi membrane over. Upper tail under wall membrane, lower tail over wall membrane.

After I lap the Kerdi over my pocket/slab "tails". I cut my wall Kerdi to 1/8 away from the slab and butter the joint with Kerdi-fix as a final measure.

After urethane grout or a good caulk after the tile goes in....I'm fairly confident you could blast a firehouse at that thing for years.

And....I always give the bench a good pitch.....gravity is my friend!

The rods really aren't that difficult. You just have to aim for the bullseye, and then assume you may miss by a bit, and be prepared.

I have never had one fail (but I tend to keep them smaller because I really don't sweat it at all that way), and I LOVE the way they look. I think they have an allure that a 3" box can't touch.
Almost like...."that ain't supposed to do that"....nope....but it does.

I would go for it. But...that's me.

Good luck.
 

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I wouldnt worry about the water as long as you do it right.

Like I said....I seal any stone that will sit within the pocket with a good 1/16-1/8" of Tenax (just as an extra precaution).

Then, I basically wrap the interior of the pocket as if it were a niche. i actually do it on the slab and leave 3" "tails" protruding out that I will then lap my Kerdi membrane over. Upper tail under wall membrane, lower tail over wall membrane.

After I lap the Kerdi over my pocket/slab "tails". I cut my wall Kerdi to 1/8 away from the slab and butter the joint with Kerdi-fix as a final measure.

After urethane grout or a good caulk after the tile goes in....I'm fairly confident you could blast a firehouse at that thing for years.

And....I always give the bench a good pitch.....gravity is my friend!

The rods really aren't that difficult. You just have to aim for the bullseye, and then assume you may miss by a bit, and be prepared.

I have never had one fail (but I tend to keep them smaller because I really don't sweat it at all that way), and I LOVE the way they look. I think they have an allure that a 3" box can't touch.
Almost like...."that ain't supposed to do that"....nope....but it does.

I would go for it. But...that's me.

Good luck.
What size hole are you drilling through the 1 1/4" thick granite? and how are you terminating that rod in the wall? Stainless steel rod?
I have done one with a SS frame and set the granite on that, but not frameless.
 

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What size hole are you drilling through the 1 1/4" thick granite? and how are you terminating that rod in the wall? Stainless steel rod?
I have done one with a SS frame and set the granite on that, but not frameless.
Like I said, I've never done a rod in a shower bench, just on 2 1/2 - 3+ mantle slabs and or shelves (wood and stone).

That's a great question. With only 1 1/4... I would be worried about a 3/4 rod, and anything smaller in diameter might be pretty worthless structurally.

Probably wouldn't go S/S......pretty weak.

I would be worried about that "unsupported" corner on a 4' slab......that's why I keep em smaller and roughly "triangular'.....no unsupported corners.

Maybe multiple 1/2" rods......but would that compromise the integrity of the slab? By backfilling the bores with some good Sikaflex epoxy though.......should be good.

Some cookbooks or a couple sculptures is a lot different than a 200lb + human. ?????????
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What about a stainless steel frame bolted to the wall. The slab material could be adhered to the frame. The bench would be about 3" thick.
 

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Like I said, I've never done a rod in a shower bench, just on 2 1/2 - 3+ mantle slabs and or shelves (wood and stone).

That's a great question. With only 1 1/4... I would be worried about a 3/4 rod, and anything smaller in diameter might be pretty worthless structurally.

Probably wouldn't go S/S......pretty weak.

I would be worried about that "unsupported" corner on a 4' slab......that's why I keep em smaller and roughly "triangular'.....no unsupported corners.

Maybe multiple 1/2" rods......but would that compromise the integrity of the slab? By backfilling the bores with some good Sikaflex epoxy though.......should be good.

Some cookbooks or a couple sculptures is a lot different than a 200lb + human. ?????????
Or 2 people :whistling

When I did a bench I asked my granite people about it, the concerns were- the granite would be weak at the drilling points, corrosion if the rods were not stainless steel, granite snapping along span. They agreed that a frame would be best and could add 3/4 to the front to hide the frame if needed.

A 12" wide x 48" slab of granite ( depending upon the species ) is really not that strong with a 200 or 300 pound point load in the center, especially a dynamic point load. :whistling
 

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Or 2 people :whistling

When I did a bench I asked my granite people about it, the concerns were- the granite would be weak at the drilling points, corrosion if the rods were not stainless steel, granite snapping along span. They agreed that a frame would be best and could add 3/4 to the front to hide the frame if needed.

A 12" wide x 48" slab of granite ( depending upon the species ) is really not that strong with a 200 or 300 pound point load in the center, especially a dynamic point load. :whistling
I figure the slab would have to be 2".....and even then...? anything over 1 3/4" I'd go for it.

I'm thinking a custom-made S/S bracket that laps over the back of the stud, has a small triangle welded in the apex (mortise the tile back a bit to get as much as possible), and then goes horizontal with a 1 1/2" x 3/8" - 1/2" L arm that gets mortised into the slab (just the 3/8 - 1/2 vertical of the L).

I'm not worried about the center. Granite is pretty stout and the 2"+/- in the pocket along the back will handle it.. If I could get that corner supported ????? I wouldn't sweat it.

All-thread sheathed in brushed nickel pipe....hung from ceiling.....DONE!

By the way OP, I take everything back.....don't you dare try some crazy chit like that! What were you thinking?:whistling
 
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