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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

3/4" gap atleast required for our floating basement walls, I usually put the gap between the bottom plates. This time the ceiling ain't drywall but suspended so I will put the gap at the top.

Should i block in between the joist and nail a top plate to that and then have my wall attached to the ground and put a spike/nail between the 2 plates to hold the gap?
 

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Hello

3/4" gap atleast required for our floating basement walls, I usually put the gap between the bottom plates. This time the ceiling ain't drywall but suspended so I will put the gap at the top.

Should i block in between the joist and nail a top plate to that and then have my wall attached to the ground and put a spike/nail between the 2 plates to hold the gap?
What's a floating basement wall?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Im in a region where ground contracting happens with our weather changes so the protentional for a basement floor to shift is there. So we are required to leave a gap between our framing plates so if the floor shifts it doesn't push up on the wall or floor joists above.

TOP PLATE
STUDS
BOTTOM PLATE
SPACE - ( 2 PLATES ARE USUALLY ATTACHED BY A SPIKE OR NAIL)
BOTTOM PLATE ATTACHED TO GROUND
 

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I used to spike them at the bottom when I was in colorado-you should probably check with the building dept. before you do it-reguardless of an inspection or not.
 

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I would do a plate nailed to the joists so it is just the same way as normal just above. I come from an area with similar requirements (1.5" here) so we do a plate glued and pinned to the concrete and then a wall lifted and nailed to ceiling, then 60D spikes driven through a predrilled hole and into the floor plate.

We float at the top where a fireplace or a TV recess would be because the weight could pull the wall down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would do a plate nailed to the joists so it is just the same way as normal just above. I come from an area with similar requirements (1.5" here) so we do a plate glued and pinned to the concrete and then a wall lifted and nailed to ceiling, then 60D spikes driven through a predrilled hole and into the floor plate.

We float at the top where a fireplace or a TV recess would be because the weight could pull the wall down.
When you do a gap at the top do you still use the spikes through the 2 top plates?

How far apart do you usually put your spikes in the bottom plates?
 
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