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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a job coming up this week. Building garage, pouring garage floor, but the temps are going to be low 40's day and high 20's at night. We form up and then hire a finish guy. I'm nervous about this as it's my dime if there's going to be problems down the line. Looking for other input on what to expect and how to proceed.
 

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AJAX,
It's that cold already by you? I'm basically straight east of you. Yesterday was a bit chilly but looking better this next week. I'm sure being this early, your redi-mix plant isn't heating water or materials yet. As other posts had said, cover that with insulated blankets before those temps get down. I generally don't seal with topical sealers when temps start getting that low. Pour that thing + get that garage built on that before the snow + ice get to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, I asked my guy but I know he needs the work so that's why I'm lookin for an unbiased opinion.

I'm going to call the plant Monday and ask about the hot water. What about adding chloride? Would that cure enough where I wouldn't have to blanket it if I pour in the morning? Just thinking about the neighborhood, don't want blankets to get stolen.
 

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Thanks, I asked my guy but I know he needs the work so that's why I'm lookin for an unbiased opinion.

I'm going to call the plant Monday and ask about the hot water. What about adding chloride? Would that cure enough where I wouldn't have to blanket it if I pour in the morning? Just thinking about the neighborhood, don't want blankets to get stolen.
There's always visqueen and straw.
Keeping the fill warm is part of the battle
as well.
Cold fill will slow the set too.
 

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There are a number of things you can so your finisher doesn't have to work into the moonlight. Blanketing the ground the night before, using calcium or non-calcium chloride + high early, pouring at a lower slump....
With lower temps., you'll still have to cover to retain heat.
 

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I agree with everything above. The only thing is: I would lay my insulating blankets & HOPE someone stole the stupid things! They're a necessary evil, by I stll opt for straw more often because it has a tendancy to leave less marks behind on the slab. One thing to keep in mind is that the control joints generally need to be sawed before the concrete can be un-covered for good.

BTW, in SE WI we generally will be able to pour things like garage slabs until early December, depending on the winter. Some years earlier, some later. We're trying to wrap up all exterior flatwork in the next week or 2 though.
 
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