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Installed new fiberglass shower, 1 piece on slab. It is H/C accessible so low sill for easy roll in and roll out. The owner is complaining about water running out the base on to floor. Setting a level on it, appear to have no slope. Any tricks to lowering the drain a bit to create some slope back to the drain without tearing the whole thing out, including drywall, vinyl etc?
 

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MHIC licensed contractor
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If there is no slope, water is just going to spread out. On wheelchair accessable showers I would normally start by ripping up the subfloor and and sloping the entire room. On a slab you may have to do something similar. Then a product like Kerdi is used to create a water barrier, and the entire floor is tiled. You can find weighted shower curtains specifically for wheelchair showers, I use them, and they may help you in this circumstance, but its only a bandaid without a sloped floor.

If the sill on the fiberglass pan is supposed to act like a barrier, then look for a weighted curtain. I actually had a customer from a house that i had built complaining about water leaks around their shower in their new home. After investigating it turned out they didnt even have a curtain, they just let the water splash all over the bathroom.
 

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The stepless shower base is almost flat and fits perfectly flush with your existing floor level, and together with Altro Safety Flooring becomes part of your bathroom floor surface.


  • No difficult steps to negotiate.
  • Simply wheel on, wheel off.
  • Extra space for those with impaired mobility.
  • Allows easy and complete access for a person showering independently or with an assistant.
  • No leakage problems.
  • Cuts labour costs.
  • Ideally priced.
 

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Gravity is gravity. Most ADA installations that I see are tiled floor, gently pitched towards the drain for the extent of the bathroom.

On terrazzo bases with ramps, the pad is oversized to account for splash, and manufactured with an 1/8" per foot pitch throughout the pan.

If your shower pan isn't sloped towards the drain, the water will just spread out. Install a hinged glass shower door to prevent water from leaving the enclosure. If your strainer is proud of the base, lower the strainer with internal cutters or however needed.

Sorry to say it but now is the wrong time to be solving this problem.

Keith
 
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