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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off I would like to say hey to everyone. I am new to the forum and would appreciate any advise from you guys who have been in the industry for some time. I am 28 years old. However I differ from most people my age. I have my way of doing things but never claim them to be the only way. I have good subs and take their advice and usually go with it seeing as how most have been in the industry as longs as i have been alive. Been in construction industry for 9 years.

I was awarded my first big job for a client and my experience has me doubting my abilities. Handling the estimating and client is not a big deal for me. Neither is building the actual building. However my weakness is site work. I have done a lot of residential but this new commercial building with a ton of parking has me doubting. Theres two ways to get around my lack of site work experience. A) Hire a superintendent B) Pay extra for my grader to handle the site work from start to finish. Allowing me to concentrate more time on my client and just the building its self.

Also have another opportunity with same client for a bigger development. That is hoping to start up in a few months. My question is should I spend my time being a site superintendent or focus on the business aspect? Things are slow and I want to maximize profits with one or two jobs going on at a time I can handle them myself typically
 

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If you bid a job & don't know WTF you are doing hire the pro's from Dover to bail you out.

In your case the dirt guy.

Do not expect this education to be for free.

Commercial clients are generally pretty savvy...

They will smell blood in the water & have you for lunch....

Which is probably why you got the job....
 

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Well how big/detailed is this job? What is your business? How did you get the job without a site work price? To vague to make a solid analysis. If its a 100 by 50 parking lot then it might be worth renting and learning yourself. If its a walmart, or a truck stop your lifes probably going to get harder lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe a little more background info is needed. While this is a commercial project it is a funeral home. To simplify its like building a BIG house with a parking lot. I do have commercial experience and a working relationship with most of my subs for 8+ years. I also have a relationship with my client (I built the home he is living in now) who likes my work. Which is why i got the contract. With all do respect Griz there is no bailing out needed here. I think this is simply a matter of working smarter and not harder. Hiring a experienced super may be the best option.
 

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I will tell you that I am 27 and do large scale commercial and haven't been able to hire a super thats reliable in 10 years for a general contract. Its not that easy. But site work is pretty easy, we built our first bridge cold turkey 65 foot span and it was way easier then building a house or a building. Also having something your company provides in house for future projects adds a bonus kicker, because while you make 5 percent on site the subs make 15 and you could do that on the site work which is often one of the big ticket items.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
While most my experience has been residential. Since the recession i spent a few years working for myself doing small homeowner projects, a year for a surveying company, and a year in commercial before going back to work for myself (which I have been now for 3 months) While this is my companies first big project its not my first one period. Im familiar with the phases just not a site work expert.
 

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Dunno what to tell you, I routinely frame side and roof 50k sq ft buildings and I wouldn't want to general something without working my way into it. Sounds like the guys your friend and you have surveying experience. Just so it yourself it'll be fun.
 

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Kenny, in your words you said you were not experienced in site work.

Site work on ANY project can come back and bite you HARD on the arse.

That removable concrete & asphalt is expensive around here....

Proper grades, drainage, underground, prep, paving and last but not least the beloved ADA stuff.

If you know your dirt guy lay your cards on the table....

In other words be honest with him.

Don't count on a Super to bail you out.

A little humility & hat in hand can go a long ways....

Best of luck to you:thumbsup:
 

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I'm with Griz on this, not based on any experience with that type of project, but on the general principle that if this is your biggest risk, then you should spend some money to reduce the risk. Doing it yourself or hiring a supervisor won't likely reduce the risk as much as paying your excavator to do it for you. Take that problem off your plate and focus on the rest of the project.
 
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