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deck aficionado
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Homeowner wants a fire pit on top of a finished deck, only thing I'm not sure about is the weight. Trex deck, 16 oc, 2x10s, 8' span, etc...should I add some additional blocking underneath the fire pit area, stay away from it altogether, any suggestions??

Once completed the sucker will weigh about 670-80 lbs

Thank ya
 

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Artist and not a curator
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Treat it separate from the deck. It should be self sustaining. Whenever I do a firepit its usually out of block and comes through the deck rather than on top. Cleaning the pit has to come into consideration.
 

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deck aficionado
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Treat it separate from the deck. It should be self sustaining. Whenever I do a firepit its usually out of block and comes through the deck rather than on top. Cleaning the pit has to come into consideration.
Interesting...but this deck has already been built, framing underneath not really an option because of how low it is to the ground

Attached pic is very similar to what we're wanting to achieve
 

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my brother in law had a lovely deck built sometime ago (before he was my brother in law) and then proceeded to put a small 4 man hot tub ontop. Anyways, it looks quite odd now with that big crooked dip in the middle... was that 670-800lbs or 67-80... cause if it's under 80 i say go for it, if it's 800 umm, nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Unless you can shore it up
 

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deck aficionado
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
my brother in law had a lovely deck built sometime ago (before he was my brother in law) and then proceeded to put a small 4 man hot tub ontop. Anyways, it looks quite odd now with that big crooked dip in the middle... was that 670-800lbs or 67-80... cause if it's under 80 i say go for it, if it's 800 umm, nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Unless you can shore it up
670-680 lbs, pit blocks weigh 20 lbs each and we need 33 plus the weight of the actual pit insert. Only beefing up I could do would block it up under the pit area. Posts/beams not happening
 

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16" is plenty of room to dig a hole, if not take out a joist and make it 32" Oh, and a skil saw or reciprical will take those boards out for you tiger claws or no... however you may have to buy a couple new boards. But ya gotta do what ya gotta do.
 

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John Hyatt
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3,658 Posts
I did real good with Fire Pits years ago. They all were built free standing with creet pad, block wall, brick/stone then the deck build going around it. No way can that much weight land on regular framing don't even worry about the silly clips.

But with the advent of all the big metal bowls lately there is no need to go thru all of that anymore. My Wallets just have me leave a place out of the decking like a round area fill it with artise fartsey rocks and place the bowl in the center. Usually I get to build benches/tables around it but the days of a $ 4/5 thousand custom build are over.


JonMon www.deckmastersllc.com
 

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Custom cabinetry
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2x10's on a 8' span on 8" centers would do that load no problem (add a couple more joists) but that also transfers to the beam and piers. Really it's not that much weight, your deck since it should be designed for 60 psf. (3'x3' area x 60 = 540 lbs).
 

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deck aficionado
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The bigger question is: what size are the beams, their span, and what size are the piers?
double 2x10 beams, 7' span between posts, 2x10 joists span 8' between beams, 18" footings/30" deep

here's some pics of the framed up version and the near finished shot
 

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That'll carry that load. That's built more like 80ish psf. Add 3-4 more joists if at all possible. If you can't get to it easily then use 2x8 for filler joists and just go beam to beam, then put blocking under the 2x8 to shim it up the other 2". Easy.
 

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deck aficionado
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That'll carry that load. That's built more like 80ish psf. Add 3-4 more joists if at all possible. If you can't get to it easily then use 2x8 for filler joists and just go beam to beam, then put blocking under the 2x8 to shim it up the other 2". Easy.
That was literally my plan. I knew there was a reason I referred some friends to you moving to your area.
 

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2x10's on a 8' span on 8" centers would do that load no problem (add a couple more joists) but that also transfers to the beam and piers. Really it's not that much weight, your deck since it should be designed for 60 psf. (3'x3' area x 60 = 540 lbs).
This is exactly the answer, your deck should be calculated to handle that. 2 X 10 only spanned 8 feet I think will withstand more then the 60 psf.. As long as your beams and posts are adequate.

EDIT: I see Robert is already on top of this. Lol
 
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