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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK this is more like a HO asking for help but I want more experience than opinion. I'm building a couple of Tom McLaughlin adirondack chairs and side tables out of white oak. (Fine Woodworking Feb 2019) I don't want to leave them unfinished because I don't want the oak to grey. I want to clear it. I don't want any type of film finish such as Poly. Maybe 30 years ago I used Cabots semi transparent oil on cedar siding that held up very well for a long time. Cabots makes a clear "stain" and I'm thinking of giving it a try.

Any siding or deck guys have any opinions or other options I should be looking at? What finish do people use on IPE or Brazilian cherry decks?

How often would I need to reapply a pennitrating type product?

I've switched over to using mostly water borne lacquer for most our interior stuff. Except for paint; I don't think film finishes belong outside because of maintenance. Am I living under a rock and there are good clear exterior finish options available?

Thanks in advance,
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So I contacted a company that manufacturers outdoor furniture out of Brazilian Cherry. Their non-film finish is basically Linseed Oil but they call it something fancy for marketing purposes. It sounds like it's a once a year kind of thing, applied with a garden mister.
 

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The problem with linseed oil is it can mildew bad outside
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank You all for your advise, knowledge and experience. Learn something new every day, like linseed oil mildews.


I've been building these things as a stress reliever, having a bad day in the office, go out to the shop and make sawdust dust. These were a lot harder than they look, have a ton of man hours into them so I'm trying not to mess them up with a bad finish. https://www.finewoodworking.com/2018/11/28/w273-modern-adirondack-chair


In hindsight, epoxy and marine varnish would have been the smartest choice but they are mostly assembled so no longer the best choice. I've learned by building a boat that epoxy really needs complete coverage. (Finish before assembly)


I think I'm going to experiment with Cabots Australian Timber Oil. Any recommendations for a similar Sherwin Williams product?


Thanks again.
 

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Black locust offers superior weather resistance but is difficult to saw and varnish. Scratches, dents, and gouges are unlikely to show up on this rugged hardwood that measures 1,700 lb f on the Janka scale. Black locust is more labor-intensive to hand- and machine-cut than cypress, redwood, and cedar, so it might not the best wood for outdoor furniture that you plan to build yourself. I made my terrace from this wood and I don't have problems with it. I bought some heavy garden furniture and I am moving it very often and the wood does not have any scratches.
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Garden Furniture From GardenFurniture.co.uk | The One The Only.
 

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I don't have much experience, and I know you didn't ask for my opinion, but I still think it might be useful. It isn't easy to finish the exterior furniture by yourself to look very good and aesthetically pleasing. You should pay attention to many details that only a specialist would know. That's why it would be better to consult a specialist about what products you should use. I finally built my outdoor furniture and added some details to my house, such as a house number plaque that I didn't even think about. But thanks to the advice of the specialist who helped me complete the furniture, I also discovered this element of home decoration that I hadn't even thought about.
 

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On a related note, if you're picking countertops for exterior use, make sure they haven't been resinated at the processing plant. I wouldn't use a built-up edge either. Resins and adhesives are no match for the sun.
 

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On a related note, if you're picking countertops for exterior use, make sure they haven't been resinated at the processing plant. I wouldn't use a built-up edge either. Resins and adhesives are no match for the sun.
And make sure any lights above the countertop get installed before it does.

Don’t want to make Lonnie mad.


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