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Structural Engineer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for advice. Had the floor done, love the color, but I'm questioning whether enough coats of oil based poly went down. You can definitely see the grain. Flooring is way out of my league, so I'm looking for advice. Is a finished wood floor (oak) supposed to be smooth as glass, or are you supposed to see the a slightly raised grain of the wood in the reflection from the sunlight? I think I've been looking at engineered floors for too long. I like the look as it is, but I'll ask the guy to put more down if it is supposed to be smooth as glass like an engineered floor. I'll wait for the sun to set a little so I can take a pic.
 

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Alot really depends on how the floors were sanded.If they were fine sanded with 80 or 100 grit and screened with a 60 or 80 grit screen they should be pretty smooth.I would ask your floor guy exactly what his sanding technique is...Put up a few pics...
 

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Structural Engineer
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Took pics but they don't show squat.

It's only noticeable at an angle, against the grain, with the bright sunshine reflecting off it. I think I may be just looking at it too closely. From overhead or along the grain, you can't notice it.

But I did call the flooring outfit, and they're going to put 2 more coats down.

I also have this fear that moisture played a part. It's been humid as hell. I opened the windows after they stained it to air the place out for a about 7 hours, and I know I let the humidity in.
 

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I'm also guessing that you might want to re-sand, re-finish and re-stain the floor, till it is the desired color and texture. If you are used to working with Engineered floors than you must realize that Solid Hardwood requires a bit more labor than your average Engineered Hardwood, plus it is definitely more sensitive to environmental conditions. Engineered Hardwood would of been the easier choice, but it is good to learn a new trick in the trade.
 

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Knowledge Factory
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Site finished never looks like prefinished wood.
Some soft grain dishout happens, even to the best.

You saw what finish was used. Contact the finish manufacture, or find their on-line specs, and see how many coats they recommend/require.;)
 

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Structural Engineer
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Floordude,

I just did a Google image search of "soft grain dishout" (because that was basically Greek to my ears) and here's the image I found. You nailed it. That is what I am seeing, although not as dramatic (my grain is tighter, and the finish is glossier). But that is precisely the effect that is going on.

Also found a link from NWFA.org, and it explained the ins and outs of it in a language I could understand. Recommended procedure to avoid it is outlined here, for those interested:

http://www.nwfa.org/uplfiles/articles/HF-0807-47.pdf

Thank you guys for teaching me something new. I'm ok leaving it as is, now that I know what it is.
 

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Paul
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Site finished never looks like prefinished wood.
Some soft grain dishout happens, even to the best.

You saw what finish was used. Contact the finish manufacture, or find their on-line specs, and see how many coats they recommend/require.;)


:thumbsup:

Or furniture. This is a hard thing make some people realize, with the explosion of pre-finished floors in the last 20 years. If you can't see it from a standing position in normal lighting usually it is an unreasonable expectation of what a site finished floor should look like.
 

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Looks a little wide for chatter marks...more likely a out of balance drum..or even worn drive belts can cause this...I change mine every 6 months or so..
 

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Knowledge Factory
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Looks a little wide for chatter marks...more likely a out of balance drum..or even worn drive belts can cause this...I change mine every 6 months or so..

I bet money in the picture above, they rode the heck out of the hardplate, with a pad, to get the waves out.:whistling
 

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Thats has nothing to do with a buffer. That would be from the sander sanding it too much with a higher grit which will sand more of the less denser spots (assuming it's severe). Same thing happens when sanding southern yellow. Shouldn't happen with oak though. But i agree if it's not as bad as the picture, to have a little of that is fairly normal.
 
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