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Kowboy
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Between advising to do something borderline shady, but not get anything written down, to advising a contractor to walk on a project when he's half way done, to bailing out when you break water lines, your advice usually just makes you look a typical Florida sleaze.
What is truly sleazy is taking another poster's comments completely out of context.
 

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Builder
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**** dude sell more jobs or sell at a higher rate! What possible service can you be providing the client or a fellow contractor for giving out a name?
 

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Builder
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Seven:

Lol. I think you're lacking context. The OP's asking about referrals for a landscape carpenter. What, a stack of railroad ties may tip over and ruin a flower bed? Of course proper licensing is a good idea when it's required, but that doesn't sound like the case here. More like a neighbor asking for a tip on a babysitter or a kid to mow grass.
Yeah or he hits a fiber optics wire or gas line setting those timbers, or breaks the driveway with a delivery, or ****s up the neighbors fence and has no insurance or capital to cover lol
 
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Builder
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It grows. First he builds flower beds, then a small fence, then a big fence, then a small gazebo, then a deck, then a porch cover, then he is attaching it to a house, then roofs it, then...

Just how it works.

Also, if your kid is next to those railroad ties and they fall over?

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He doesn't care about that kid or the HO
 

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Op: if your counting on small potatoes such as a lead — finders fee, & it means that much to you is your operation legit? If so, putting a non legit friend, sub whatever on any client is shady to say the least. Don’t say much for your operation. But your probably gone

Mike
 

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No more than 3% for a referral. Most just mutually refer, and call it even.

I wouldn't refer anyone who is unlicensed for work that requires a license. You definitely have iability if you do that, IMO.
I used to sell roofs for living during a time of layoff. I earned 10% of total price for the commissions. Everyone I know that is commissioned is near the same value or more. Even a GC tacks on more than 3% for his subs as he has to manage them. Many charge 10-15%. With regard to some states requiring a sales license....I am unsure how they could possibly limit to one contractor/trade etc. That would be "restraint of trade" and easily be bypassed under federal statutes. Besides, Home Depot would be illegally referring then. They make a commission as general but never touch a job or oversee it at all, that means they are sales ONLY and would not meet the requirement.
That being said, if anyone asks about something you know your friend can do then you can tell the customer you know a workman who would work as long as the owner acts as the contractor. Leave it at that.
With regard to your friend. Make sure he is keeping proper records and that he has filed his worker's comp exemption and not hiring help (unless they are worker's comp covered (possibly by employee leasing)). If he is a friend then steer him toward becoming legal and licensed in the end.
 

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This is a two-part question.

I have a friend who has been working for my landscaping company for a few years doing outdoor carpentry on some landscaping projects. We have decided to go our separate ways (never hire your friends!) but he asked if I could send work his way in exchange for a finder's fee. So,

1) What would be a fair percentage to ask for a finder's fee? I may not hire another carpenter for a while so I'm not trying to recover that cost necessarily.
2) He is not licensed or insured, so I would definitely let my clients know this ahead of time so they can decide the level of risk they are comfortable with, but could I be held liable for making the referral if anything went wrong?

Thanks
Well after you posted this I don't think you should. LOL. IF you do, then make sure to tell whoever that he isn't licensed, then it's all on the owner that hires the person. Better yet help them get licensed; it isn't that hard, and it protects everyone involved.
 

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I used to sell roofs for living during a time of layoff. I earned 10% of total price for the commissions. Everyone I know that is commissioned is near the same value or more. Even a GC tacks on more than 3% for his subs as he has to manage them. Many charge 10-15%. With regard to some states requiring a sales license....I am unsure how they could possibly limit to one contractor/trade etc. That would be "restraint of trade" and easily be bypassed under federal statutes. Besides, Home Depot would be illegally referring then. They make a commission as general but never touch a job or oversee it at all, that means they are sales ONLY and would not meet the requirement.
That being said, if anyone asks about something you know your friend can do then you can tell the customer you know a workman who would work as long as the owner acts as the contractor. Leave it at that.
With regard to your friend. Make sure he is keeping proper records and that he has filed his worker's comp exemption and not hiring help (unless they are worker's comp covered (possibly by employee leasing)). If he is a friend then steer him toward becoming legal and licensed in the end.
It's not illegal to make commission on a sale here you just need to be registered with the contractors board as a salesman.


Mike.
___
 

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Contractor Government Paperwork / Consultant
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This is a two-part question.

I have a friend who has been working for my landscaping company for a few years doing outdoor carpentry on some landscaping projects. We have decided to go our separate ways (never hire your friends!) but he asked if I could send work his way in exchange for a finder's fee. So,

1) What would be a fair percentage to ask for a finder's fee? I may not hire another carpenter for a while so I'm not trying to recover that cost necessarily.
2) He is not licensed or insured, so I would definitely let my clients know this ahead of time so they can decide the level of risk they are comfortable with, but could I be held liable for making the referral if anything went wrong?

Thanks
This is never a great idea. Carpentry license will be eliminated in July of 2023 in the state of Florida. Pinellas County has a landscape/fertilizer license with a sub agency ( atleast in Pinellas County) cannot speak for the entire state/ it varies from county to county. The thing is if a customer files a complaint, - then you have consumer protection and state attorneys office involved and your name gets brought up. Its not worth the aggravation or time.
 

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It's not illegal to make commission on a sale here you just need to be registered with the contractors board as a salesman.
Mike.
That's exactly the rule here also. But the salesman can only sell for one contractor. He has to register as that contractor's salesman. If the salesman changes the contractor he works for, he has to change his registration.
 

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With regard to some states requiring a sales license.... I am unsure how they could possibly limit to one contractor/trade etc. That would be "restraint of trade" and easily be bypassed under federal statutes.
They can and they do in MI. No it isn't restraint of trade and not all restraints of trade are illegal.
You can always sue the state and we'll all watch and see how they can :)
 

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This is a two-part question.

I have a friend who has been working for my landscaping company for a few years doing outdoor carpentry on some landscaping projects. We have decided to go our separate ways (never hire your friends!) but he asked if I could send work his way in exchange for a finder's fee. So,

1) What would be a fair percentage to ask for a finder's fee?



(Practicing on old threads.)


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I agree with what everyone is saying about being legit but having the license doesn't guarantee that the guy would have GL or WC or a safety plan.

Alot of the people that have a license and GC here are briefcase builders and don't know crap about erecting a structure or doing the actual work.

Basically having the license means you get to be part of the lawsuit whether you did anything wrong or not.

Michigan says anything you charge more then $600 for you should be licensed and insured even if your just a laborer. The fact that somebody is licensed doesn't mean they still aren't going to tip the railroad ties on someone or hit the underground or do crap work it just gives dumb ass customers some recourse for their own stupidity.

How many times have we all been told after someone got the royal sphincter massage dry that they wished we would have done their project? I say do your due diligence as a customer.

As said before OP should step back or maybe assist the guy in becoming legit.
 
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