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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am bidding a job to turn a concrete block building into a dog boarding kennel. Part of the project is to fill the mortar joints so as to make a smooth wall surface that can be coated with an epoxy paint. This is to allow the walls to be hosed down when needed. Filling the joints is only cosmetic, but that is what the owner wants. Is there an epoxy product that I can use to fill these joints? I don't want to parge the whole wall. Thanks, John
 

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Please complete your profile, and continue to the intro page and tell us a little about yourself and your professional experience, thankyou and welcome to ct"

gmod
 

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If the joints were properly tooled, you have 2 choices:

Parge the whole wall.

Or

Grind out the joints to a depth of 3/8" and tuck flush.



The best option is just to seal the wall with an epoxy and not worry about the joints, again, provided they were properly tooled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The problem is that the walls already have a latex paint on them. The customer doesn't want to see the mortar joints, and I don't want to grind all the joints out and tuck them in. I was hoping there was a product that would bond to the painted joints and provide a fairly smooth and level surface that could be epoxy coated. Probably too much to ask for. John
 

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Yeah, TSCAR is dead-on. It can be done. A month ago we found hollow joints in a 30yr old chimney. Outside Boston, north shore. Think we wanted to grind out the joints. It started as piece work and my boss says 'do u think we should do it all?' I go, 'yeah'. We won't get into the crazy situation that went on there. But we ground all the joints, a million of them and grouted them in. If the blocks are hollow- even easier than brick. Obviously if it's the interior side, the shape of the joints is irrelevant. GL, take pics!
 

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I think TS is right about the paint. I can't see anything establishing a good bond with paint already on the surface. Your basically looking at parging the whole wall.

Probably faster to attach wire and parge than to get enough paint off to get a good grip with the parge.

Hope the ink isn't dry on the contract for this one.:whistling
 

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What about an electric wire brush for the paint? Are they washing it with a pressure washer? Why why why
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think you are right that the whole wall needs to be parged. I'm thinking sand blasting would be cheaper than nailing up wire.
 

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you will have about 75 sheets of lath.not sure what your cost is but around here its close to 10 bucks a sheet.so your close to 750 bucks there.plus your nails or whatever you use to attach it with.plus your time to install.nailing on lath on a framed wall with a staple gun,you could install 1200 feet in a day easy.i would say it will take a couple on a block wall.so you need to find the cost of sandblasting and figure the costs i pointed out and go from there.remember with sandblasting you will have a mess to clean up before anything can be done to the wall.
 
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