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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As an apprentice, I sometimes get asked to do just about anything. This time I am being asked to install 8 Security cameras throughout the business. The security cameras require an electrical outlet to provide power to the camera. But the entire office area already has been drywalled. So what I have to do is feed a #12-2 wire horizontally from an existing outlet to make a new outlet.

How do I feed electrical wires horizontally through the drywall without making a mess? Is there a trick to doing it?

Signed, At my wits end with this job
 

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How far?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have to feed wires for 8 electrical outlets. The are a variety of different ranges, some I can feed through the attic space, but there is one the I have to take it about 10 feet horizontally, others anywhere from 4 feet to 8 feet.
 

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What kind of cameras? Why not get the right cables so you can power them from one location...

If this is a commercial space, romex is not the right answer..
 

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there are some dome cameras and there is 2 large outside cameras. I the owner has already bought the coax cable as well as the romex. I think that what you are saying is a good idea, except I do not know how to do it. And I think in the long term it would be cheaper. I think you use Cat-5 Cable, but I have no idea how to install it to the camera as well as to the power source. Can you tell me how to do it. ?
 

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there are some dome cameras and there is 2 large outside cameras. I the owner has already bought the coax cable as well as the romex. I think that what you are saying is a good idea, except I do not know how to do it. And I think in the long term it would be cheaper. I think you use Cat-5 Cable, but I have no idea how to install it to the camera as well as to the power source. Can you tell me how to do it. ?
This tells me you are already in over your head, as well as the owner doesn't have a clue.

It sounds like the owner is attempting to install such a cheap system that it will end up being the most expensive system he could possibly get. The stingiest person spends the most.

Go get a system that is powered by a hybrid cable, or contact a professional to install it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The hardest part of this job is running the wire. for the cat-5 cable i assume you would use a RJ-45 connector? I do have considerable amount of experience running wire for dishwashers, garberators, as well as switches. Im not totally clueless. I dont think im in over my head, and the owner expects me to figure this out.

Is there anyone else that has some experience with CCTV cameras, all I need to know is how to connect the CAT-5 cable to the camera itself as well as to the DVR and power source. Is there a pictorial representation, of how to do it out there? If the hardest thing about this job is crimping wires together, than im sure I can do it.
 

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It is far cheaper and easier to get the right siamese cable and a power distribution panel, than to try and put outlets all over the place and those ugly transformer blocks to power the cameras.

Siamese cable doesn't cost that much more, a power distribution panel is well under a $100, now what does the romex, outlets, and transfomers cost, plus the time to mess around with it cost.
 

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It is far cheaper and easier to get the right siamese cable and a power distribution panel, than to try and put outlets all over the place and those ugly transformer blocks to power the cameras.

Siamese cable doesn't cost that much more, a power distribution panel is well under a $100, now what does the romex, outlets, and transfomers cost, plus the time to mess around with it cost.

As I said...... the stingiest person spends the most. :thumbsup:
 

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there are some dome cameras and there is 2 large outside cameras. I the owner has already bought the coax cable as well as the romex. I think that what you are saying is a good idea, except I do not know how to do it. And I think in the long term it would be cheaper. I think you use Cat-5 Cable, but I have no idea how to install it to the camera as well as to the power source. Can you tell me how to do it. ?
As others have said the correct way to do this is with a power supply (since they don't need 120v to power them) then all you have to do it run 2 #14 wires to each camera for power. You also need a coax from the camera to the DVR. At least this is how the systems I've worked on are done. Also you mention something about a "outside" camera? If you have any cameras that are outside you need a 120v power source at the camera for the heater unit.
 

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I think several posters are just participating in specious guessing here. Some cameras do require line voltage, normally supplied by a nearby u-ground recepticle. Other cameras use a coax cable and some a data cable. I think the more modern units use a digital output, and are LV DC powered, either from a central location, or a transformer near the individual camera.
You are correct, without knowing what equipment is being used it's all guessing. My response it what I've personally worked on. They were LV DC powered and used a dvr. We set a power supply in a j-box then ran out from there for power. Then a home run from each camera to the dvr with coax for the signal. There were also some PTZ units that required a separate cable for control. That is all they required with the exception of the outdoor units which required 120v for the special enclosure which was heated.
 

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Fatboy,

I apologize to you for my post, I unfairly criticized you. And without my bifocals, I missed a seemingly minor but important statement in your post
 

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The only time we put 120 to the camera is for outdoor PTZ cameras that draw several amps and are too far to power from a central location. ALL other cameras, including interior PTZ's, as long as the wire run isnt too long, and exterior fixed cams with heaters, get siamese (coax + 18/2) home runs.

If CAT5e/6 is spec'd, then you need a camera that has a UTP connection on it, or a BALUN to convert the coax to utp. You would also need a Balun at the dvr. For power, you either use an 18/2 home run, or you can get balun's that will put the power over the spare pairs in the CAT5e/6 cable.

Most jobs it is more economical to run the siamese cable to the cameras than have to deal with baluns and cat5/6 and crimping and all that. CAT5e/6 makes more sense on longer runs, and you would likely put the power supply for that camera closer too it, or central to a group of cameras that are farther from the dvr.

Most PTZ's I work with now can get the control signal from the dvr over the coax or utp, but you need to make sure the camera and dvr speak the same language (Pelco Coaxitron, Bosch BiLinx, Etc)
 

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I'm more then willing to help you out with any CCTV install questions you may have but first I ask the following:

Read the manual that comes with the camera, determine what type of camera it is and what power it requires. Does it actually take line level voltage? Very very few cameras do. Is it an IP camera or an analog camera?

To help you any further we need details of what you are trying to do and what equipment you are working with...No point playing "you may have this/ he may be trying to do that"

PS Royal, the communication over coax like the Bilinx is just plain awesome! Although I had a 500i die that was a month and a half old and Bosch tool 3 weeks to repair it.:sad:
 

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As an apprentice, I sometimes get asked to do just about anything. This time I am being asked to install 8 Security cameras throughout the business. The security cameras require an electrical outlet to provide power to the camera. But the entire office area already has been drywalled. So what I have to do is feed a #12-2 wire horizontally from an existing outlet to make a new outlet.

How do I feed electrical wires horizontally through the drywall without making a mess? Is there a trick to doing it?

Signed, At my wits end with this job
Back to the running wires horizontally without making a mess, to my knowledge you can't. This means you get to be an apprentice drywaller too!:clap:

Actually though, there are alternative ways to run laterally.

1. Is there a drop ceiling at this facility? What about an attic overhead?

2. Crawlspace or basement? You can run wires vertically pretty easily using the right kind of pilot bit and then using stiff wire-fishing rods...

Ah, nevermind. With all the equipment you'd need to buy, you need to call an electrician.
 
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