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the pipe master
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501 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So it's time to renew and I was reading my policy. I discovered that for all intensive purposes, I'm uninsured. Sure I pay for insurance, but nothing that could actually happen is covered.

Bodily injury or property damage arising from: pollutants (smoke), fire, mold, earth moving and excavation, damage from vehicles, lead based paints, Copper Chromate Arsenate, Negligence, Intoxication, release of pathogens or disease, vandalism, acts of war, acts of terrorism and the list goes on and on, boiler work (this is particularly disturbing since I do work on boilers and apparently have been uninsured).

After all of the exclusions are factored in, NOTHING THAT COULD EVER CONCEIVABLY HAPPEN IS COVERED!

What do I do?

I have the wife call around and we get pretty much the same language from everyone. WTF is the point of having insurance if it won't cover anything that is actually likely to happen?

Does anyone know of a company that sells REAL insurance?
 

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Capra Aegagrus
Remodeler
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24,384 Posts
Far as I've seen, if you want real insurance that will truly cover you in anything approaching a comprehensive manner, you stand a very poor chance of being able to remain in business because of how much it will cost you.

Because of that, I pretty much go with the bare minimum needed to be legal, and try very hard (as we all should anyway) to avoid any situations that would necessitate finding out just how poor the actual coverage is.
 

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the pipe master
Joined
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501 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Based on what I've looked into so far, GL insurance actually covers very little. It's kinda scary really. I think most contractors out their are actually uninsured. From what I've seen so far, GL basically pays the bill when some else was at fault and then sues them on your behalf to get their money back.

If you (or any of your employees) where the one at fault, you are uninsured.
Pretty scary. All it takes is any one of your employees to forget to glue a fitting or something and you could be hit for tens of thousands of $.

It looks like the actual insurance only starts when you purchase an "errors and omissions policy".

I did note that GL does cover you for false advertising or libel........so long as it wasn't negligent.....which I would say any of those claims would constitute negligence. So their again, what does GL actually cover?



Selling insurance for dummies: Tell client that "x" is covered and have him sign top copy. Make sure that every possible way that "x" could happen is excluded from the policy on the rest of the pages.

End rant!
 

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Registered
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2,940 Posts
So it's time to renew and I was reading my policy. I discovered that for all intensive purposes, I'm uninsured. Sure I pay for insurance, but nothing that could actually happen is covered........ boiler work (this is particularly disturbing since I do work on boilers and apparently have been uninsured).....
Do you actually work on the pressure parts of the boiler? Boiler work is generally covered by the ASME, and the best insurance is offered by Hartford Steam Boiler.
 

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the pipe master
Joined
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501 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I rarely work on actual steam boilers but I do frequently work on large commercial water heaters which are technically considered boilers.

Say I change a gas control valve on a commercial water heater (boiler) and it somehow ends up causing a flood or blowes up or causes a fire, with my current company I'm not covered. That's really scary.

Do you actually work on the pressure parts of the boiler? Boiler work is generally covered by the ASME, and the best insurance is offered by Hartford Steam Boiler.
 

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the pipe master
Joined
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501 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
According to the ASME, anything that heats over 120 gallon at a time or anything that heats to over 180F is considered a "boiler" even though it may not actually boil water. There is also a BTU/hr threshold that if crossed, turns any water heater of any type into a boiler.



So it sounds like your work is not covered by ASME rulings. That's good.
 

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Registered
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According to the ASME, anything that heats over 120 gallon at a time or anything that heats to over 180F is considered a "boiler" even though it may not actually boil water. There is also a BTU/hr threshold that if crossed, turns any water heater of any type into a boiler.
My boiler experience was limted to boilers in the size range 20 to 450 megawatts. Water heaters was something we didn't work on
 

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the pipe master
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501 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Just an update. I ended up going with federated. They suck, but they sucked far less than my previous policy and less than everyone else I checked into.

At least the agent was honest about the areas they sucked in. That goes a long way with me :thumbsup:.
 
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