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Builder/Remodeler
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3,811 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this has been discussed before, but I thought I'd bring it up again.

I had a kitchen remodel fail an inspection today because of a rule I'd never heard of. I'm curious to know if this is being enforced more and more across the country (or being banned altogether). I've had flexible gas line installed on a number of projects and this is the first time this has ever been brought up by an inspector.

He claimed the new rule is that any flexible gas line must have a minimum 2" clearance from any metal duct work, conduit or electrical line. The reasoning behind the rule being that in the event of a lightning strike, current can arc through the thin wall gas line and cause an explosion. He did not, however, mention any grounding requirement---which as I've researched this more surprises me.

My plumber called in to the local union heads and it's my understanding this is a rule they have only just begun to enforce here in Indy.

http://www.wthr.com/global/story.asp?s=8657223&ClientType=Printable
 

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Curmudgeon
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11,706 Posts
I know this has been discussed before, but I thought I'd bring it up again.

I had a kitchen remodel fail an inspection today because of a rule I'd never heard of. I'm curious to know if this is being enforced more and more across the country (or being banned altogether). I've had flexible gas line installed on a number of projects and this is the first time this has ever been brought up by an inspector.

He claimed the new rule is that any flexible gas line must have a minimum 2" clearance from any metal duct work, conduit or electrical line. The reasoning behind the rule being that in the event of a lightning strike, current can arc through the thin wall gas line and cause an explosion. He did not, however, mention any grounding requirement---which as I've researched this more surprises me.

My plumber called in to the local union heads and it's my understanding this is a rule they have only just begun to enforce here in Indy.

http://www.wthr.com/global/story.asp?s=8657223&ClientType=Printable
Sounds like he's talking about
the new "bonding" requirements.
Everyone seems too sketchy for me,
I'm just going with black pipe til
everyone is telling me the same story.
 
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Builder/Remodeler
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3,811 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
sleeve it in pvc pipe where needed
Sleeving doesn't matter according to my inspector. 2" minimum from any continuous metal, period.

Apparently this was part of 2005 code amendments--but the inspectors in my area have only recently been through CSST training to enforce it.
 

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Professional Instigator
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6,872 Posts
Sleeving doesn't matter according to my inspector. 2" minimum from any continuous metal, period.

Apparently this was part of 2005 code amendments--but the inspectors in my area have only recently been through CSST training to enforce it.

New code changes or additions always bring problems with them
 

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Registered
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18 Posts
Every Code in the UPC states "Up to the administrator authority" the inspector.
You can try and fight with some of these bozo's which will hold up your project or just correct it.

I had one in San Diego ask for some lame as #!^$, just did it and moved on.
 

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Talking Head
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5,388 Posts
This thread is older than my daughter but.....still relevant. My plumber switched me over to black pipe for pretty much everything. As he put it, "It would take a much dumber a$$hole to put a screw through this than through a piece of flex".
 
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