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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for guidance please.

Location - Nisku Alberta Canada. (whole industrial park is built on reclaimed swamp)
Timeline - Completed End June latest!

2300 ft^2 x 2" (50mm) deep equipment pit needs to be filled flush and fair!!! 24" x 24" x 60" deep drain pit in the center.
Unable to dig out and refill as there is 48" of solid pour and re-bar underneath!!
Job is inside an empty heated unit. Machine oil contamination in concrete pit.
After completed - heavy forklift traffic - heavy duty pipe racks - possible impact situations!!

All in all a bit of a "challenge"! I am in need of advise of what type of concrete, how to prep the substrate and most important how to avoid it cracking up after 2 years!!

To be honest with you all, I am the factory user and I want to review what various contractors are proposing to ensure all objectives are achieved.

Many Thanks
 

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There are many things to consider when attempting to produce a high-quality slab, particularly a monolithic slab, and/or one that has been built on a site as you're indicating, and to meet the conditions you have listed. Honestly, there are too many construction and site variables that must be taken into account. Most, if not all, of these things can only be successfully accomplished with an on-site evaluation then designing and implementing the proper solution to fit your needs/usage.

Just a couple of things to consider:

What type of soil is on-site and what is it's bearing capacity?

Water table?

In order to determine what will work for your project site, as well as what will best meet your needs, you truly need to hire a competent engineer first, who will then design the optimal solution, which the contractor can implement. Any project built on a site where the water table is high, and/or the soil bearing capacity isn't very good, an engineer will be money well-spent, and in essence, a necessity. Otherwise, I would say the chances are pretty high that you won't be happy at some point in the near future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank You Jeff G

Just to clarify the task - This is an existing 18,000 ft^2 industrial unit built in July 2006 - The majority of the slab is in "good" condition and is 6 - 8" thick on 24" of sand and 6" sq mesh - minimal cracking and no signs of heave or sag - no frost or temperature issues.
We just have this area that is recessed by 2" with an absolutely solid 48" of concrete under it - This equipment pit was installed in 2008 and there is zero indication of movement - we have lazered it to validate that it is absolutely flat +/- 1/32" over 85'!! This machine slab has no cracks, no splits and no floating movement in relationship to the main area slab.
I will say that the sump does fill with water and currently (snow melt time) we are pumping about 12" every week - in the summer and middle of winter the sump only gets damp!
Our maintenance foreman was around when the machine slab was poured and he did validate the 48" of concrete thickness on top of a (to quote) "huge sand pit"!
I am fiding out about what piece of equipment was moved off this pit (size/wt/function etc.)as it is now be relocated to one of our Houston facilities.

I hope that this offers more insight - Thanks
 
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