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Don't own one but we have put up a bunch of sioux buildings and one Coverall. Owners are always happy with them. Very easy to put together and alot of farmers erect the 70' and 84' themselves.
 

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I've seen these things around from time to time. Very interesting. I wonder how efficient are they to heat and cool? They don't look like they'd have much insulating value.
 

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The local farmers in my area have had decent luck with the hoop buildings as long as the proper precautions were taken to protect against the wind. We did install a fabric building with a pitched roof. Dispite the Nebraska prairie winds, the cover lasted 2 years. We later replaced the fabric with steel panels. The major drawback to the pitched roof design was the sharp corners that wore on the fabric. Most fabric buildings around here are used to store equipment and hay.
 

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Hello Hoop,

I realize your post asking what experience others had with fabric buildings was some time ago, but wanted to chime in with my friend's experience. Hope this helps, if you haven't decided or are considering for future recommendations.

I had a buddy who had an equipment company in Alaska and wanted to keep his equipment from freezing up during the winter and keep it out of the elements. He decided to try a fabric building and purchased a Cover All. He said the experience of purchasing the building went very smoothly, despite a longer than expected delivery time.

He was told by the Cover All reps the cover would last 5 years. It lasted 2 years. Not only did the cold weather get to it, but as NC1112 described, the winds caused the metal and fabric to rub together, eventually requiring replacing the cover.

And then the issue with the Dallas Cowboys happened (whereby they were producing buildings that weren't actually engineered, it collapsed, killed a person, injured others) and they went belly up. I believe they were eventually bought out by another fabric building company.

My recommendation was to buy a metal building, which he explained was not as portable as a fabric building, but didn't want to have to deal with the upkeep. Fabric buildings reportedly require much less maintenance.

Through a mutual friend of ours who does a lot of hunting and operates a small mining company who also lives in Alaska, he was referred to Alaska Structures. The fabric buildings they produce are highly engineered, have done projects all over the world and in hot and cold climates, can be insulated to specific R-values, and they even set it up for him.

He has had the fabric building by Alaska Structures for 4 years without a problem and swears by them.

I am still in favor of a metal building, but given how quickly they are to setup, can be moved time and time again, can be insulated, engineered for specific location building codes for wind and snow, and made to be maintenance free ...I may reconsider.

Hope this helps. -Jim B.
 

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Jimbo91900 and his "friend"......

Hmmm, 1st post and responding directly to this issue. Interesting. :whistling:

Just sayin'
 

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jimbo91900 said:
Hello Hoop,

I realize your post asking what experience others had with fabric buildings was some time ago, but wanted to chime in with my friend's experience. Hope this helps, if you haven't decided or are considering for future recommendations.

I had a buddy who had an equipment company in Alaska and wanted to keep his equipment from freezing up during the winter and keep it out of the elements. He decided to try a fabric building and purchased a Cover All. He said the experience of purchasing the building went very smoothly, despite a longer than expected delivery time.

He was told by the Cover All reps the cover would last 5 years. It lasted 2 years. Not only did the cold weather get to it, but as NC1112 described, the winds caused the metal and fabric to rub together, eventually requiring replacing the cover.

And then the issue with the Dallas Cowboys happened (whereby they were producing buildings that weren't actually engineered, it collapsed, killed a person, injured others) and they went belly up. I believe they were eventually bought out by another fabric building company.

My recommendation was to buy a metal building, which he explained was not as portable as a fabric building, but didn't want to have to deal with the upkeep. Fabric buildings reportedly require much less maintenance.

Through a mutual friend of ours who does a lot of hunting and operates a small mining company who also lives in Alaska, he was referred to Alaska Structures. The fabric buildings they produce are highly engineered, have done projects all over the world and in hot and cold climates, can be insulated to specific R-values, and they even set it up for him.

He has had the fabric building by Alaska Structures for 4 years without a problem and swears by them.

I am still in favor of a metal building, but given how quickly they are to setup, can be moved time and time again, can be insulated, engineered for specific location building codes for wind and snow, and made to be maintenance free ...I may reconsider.

Hope this helps. -Jim B.
So how long have you been framing, Jim?
 

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"A glorified tent salesman"

Sound about as duable as the alum frame carport buildings they make around here.......with 29 ga sq tubing and propanel
 
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