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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Replacing barn board siding, I've been on an extended search looking for rough sawn poplar that is air-dried. Which I cannot locate. This is for a barn and attached riding arena that is all poplar sided (vertical sided with battens). Many of the battens are split (about 90) and there are a number of rotting and deformed siding sections.

Seems the best I've been able to find is kiln dried (which has first been air dried) . Either this, or going with green poplar that is just cut. Everybody I've contacted does kiln dried only.

The stain is predetermined - solid color latex/acrylic stain - which the rest of the surfaces already have on it. And the paint dealer says for new wood it should have no moisture, which will cause it to peel (we've already had a peeling issue on the exposure sides). If it's put up green, then might have to wait until next spring to stain it.

So my question is will kiln dried poplar last on an exterior application? Are not open to hemlock or fir and am not for cedar with the tanin issue.

Vertical siding is about 7 3/4" wide by 1 1/8" thick at varying lengths.
Battens are about 3" wide by 1/2" thick.
 

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why wouldn't you want kiln dri?

and i'm not sure about your painter but the thing you want to do is paint it asap or better yet put a coat on on the ground then a second after install

you want to protect it from u.v exposure for too long
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
why wouldn't you want kiln dri?

and i'm not sure about your painter but the thing you want to do is paint it asap or better yet put a coat on on the ground then a second after install

you want to protect it from u.v exposure for too long
I've gotten two views - a) kiln dried is really for interior applications only, since it is so dry, and - b) kiln dry is okay for exterior.

So I'm trying to find the truth.

Are you saying this to paint the inner edges that will be concealed behind the battons?
 

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wannabe
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I'm with world llc.... find a different wood for exterior use! Poplar will not hold up without a concerted effort at regular maintenance and special attention during installation. You are replacing barn boards for a reason...

Larch is pretty common at local mills here in WNY. I'm not very familiar with Larch, but poplar sounds like a bad idea especially on a low maintenance building like a horse barn.

Just my opinion of course.
 
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I like Green things
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My 120 year old house is sided in polar, tons of them and barns are around here.

With that being said, DO NOT use it outside anymore. IT WILL NOT LAST, more then about 2 years and then will do the same thing.

Get Cypress and who cares how it is dried. Let it sit for a week where it is going and it will acclimate to the current conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I understand Cypress and White Oak are better than poplar.

But there is the cost, which I've gotten quotes on which is almost about 80% more, and we already have some inside-stored poplar from when the barn was built ..

battens: have about 30 leftover and need about 60 more

siding: have about 8 leftover and need about a dozen more.

The big other factor is that the whole rest of the barn is already done in aging poplar. This is a 5 stall barn with attached riding arena. I'm replacing less than 15% of the battens and less than 4% of the siding (very approximate give or take).

Barn is about 12 years old, and riding arena about 8 years old. Both sections share the same southwestern exposure side - they reacted in the same way.

Has poplar changed all that much in the last 10 years, realizing that the much older stuff was a whole lot better?

I can't say if the poplar that was put up originally was kiln or air dried and I cannot contact the builder.
 

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My 120 year old house is sided in polar, tons of them and barns are around here.
wonder why it was more poplar back then?:clap:

seriously may not be the wood of choice i think you seal all edges you will at least give it a better shot than the original i'm suspecting got,maybe a good idea would be to install it so repairs/replacements can be easier done,like keep it independent of the soffit system,make sure you don't fasten through the panels when installing the battens,this is a big factor in board splitting

any wood job should be inspected and problem areas addressed periodically,this could be a service your company might provide?
 
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