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I have a potential client that is looking to build a home on an infill lot in a downtown area. The new home would be built property line to property line, and the home on the adjacent lot is set off the property line approximately 14" (ie only 14" between the two buildings. The rest of the home is to going to be brick, but the mason and stucco subs are shaking their heads at trying to work in that tight of a space. The architect stuck a note on the plans saying to use structural insulated panels, but shows no details, no attachment details and actually still shows brick on the plans.

Any ideas on what type of finish to us here?

I have a potential client that is looking to build a home on an infill lot in a downtown area. The new home would be built property line to property line, and the home on the adjacent lot is set off the property line approximately 14" (ie only 14" between the two buildings. The rest of the home is to going to be brick, but the mason and stucco subs are shaking their heads at trying to work in that tight of a space. The architect stuck a note on the plans saying to use structural insulated panels, but shows no details, no attachment details and actually still shows brick on the plans.

Any ideas on what type of finish to us here?
 

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Tyvek is a nice finish isn't it?

I've seen siding put on a space that was less than 3', but 14"? How are you allowed to build right on the property line anyway? I know it doesn't help with your problem, I'm just wondering
 

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As long as it looks good on paper:rolleyes: Either change the footprint of the building or change it to brick so they can work from the inside of the building. Some things just aren't possible:no: Or you could hire some very,very,very skinny people...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We do 0' setbacks frequently in ubran areas, you just have to have the correct fire rated walls, layouts that still meet egress requirements and a lot of asprin. Think about filling in between two old brownstones in new york.

The problem is the lot is only 20' wide, so there is no option to suck in the footprint and we are in a high wind zone coastal area and we have to have our exterior sheathing nailed to the extreme so we can't lay the brick from the inside.

Its a 40' long wall that will be 35' high when finished, so standing in one piece would be near impossible.

The maintenance comment made me think maybe we can pitch tying into the existing structure next door to that property owner. They were against my client building to begin with, but maybe if you phrase it as "you can have a 12" crack thats going to be a nightmare, or you can let me build to your home and make it look good for both of us" they will be more amendable.
 

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Huh.

well I've got nothing for you. Maybe build that wall out of block and have them stucco or brick as they go up but that would be a major change to the plans
 

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The maintenance comment made me think maybe we can pitch tying into the existing structure next door to that property owner. They were against my client building to begin with, but maybe if you phrase it as "you can have a 12" crack thats going to be a nightmare, or you can let me build to your home and make it look good for both of us" they will be more amendable.
That's legally complicated and expensive, often involving moving lot lines. Theoretically possible but never happens.
 

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Stand the wall completely finished?

As to subsequent maintence....:censored:it
That's exactly how you do it. If building multiple floors you figure out the flashing system very carefully. Get that architect to clarify the detail: you don't want to be tearing out a semi-blind wall because the neighbor notes that the plans say it was supposed to be brick.
 

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Back to the original question of what finish to use: wood lap siding is the traditional, long-lasting finish here, but the architect really needs to decide on something that's permanent, will supply the necessary fire rating, and that's feasible. That 14" gap means that it will be exposed to some weather (as opposed to a wall right against a neighboring wall, with flashed parapets above).
 

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Is the 14" for a earthquake drift space requirement?

The local concrete precasters here produce panels with thin brick, that'd just leave the skinny caulker to work in the "crack", detail all the welds on the inside of the panels.

Maybe build at site tip up wall assemblies, build the floor diaphram, use as work space, build walls and finish exterior flat, tip up and fasten down, rinse and repeat...

Alternate, build to FFE, build 'Party' wall on floor system inwards X number of feet vertically (normal postion) roll out to finial position,secure?

What is the HO's maintinance plan? hire anorexic painters? i'd consider using siding products that don't need to painted, maybe even steel panels over some fiberglass gyp board? can't see it, so who cares it looks like a cow shed...

long term, it'd save both owners to enclose the space...to all the codes of course.

How is the neighbor supposed to maintain His house wall after the new one is Sky hooked in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We aren't seismic where we are so I've never heard of a drift requirement.

Enclosing the space is going to be the best bet. It can be done without moving property lines etc, just have to get the neighbor to agree to a free 12" addition ;)

Thanks for all your help.
 

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I conflated the SFO response as the OPer's address....


Long term, a actual Party wall with properly designed break away/ burn away connections would be superior to a 14" wasted space, lower insurence premimuns and higher resale for both units.... General Sherman might ride again...

Just widen existing footing and add a wythe of masonry to carry the added loads of the new building. Replat the lot line at the new Party wall center.

I always charge more for brown field work, even adding a % to the last house in a block on greenfield work because of access issues.. this would take planning at a whole other level. Enjoy the challenge.
 
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