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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When a homeowner what's to make there front porch
larger, I tell them we need to add a new footing around
existing footing, cause it needs to be all contiguous pour.
Question is have you guys try tieing old footing to
new. Let's say they want the right side extended
5 feet. So tearout old brick face at cement to, and
Rebuild from footing. I heard some guys just tie in
to old footing with rebar. but I would thinks it will crack where
Its tried at. So I would like to here your opinion. Thanks
 

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I'm not sure I totally understand but I'll take a stab....get down to existing footing, drill and epoxy new rebar, probably 2. Add new footing, lay brick, block, whatever. If soil is undisturbed, you should not have a problem. You can add a bondbeam, and use durawall in brick as well....u do masonry?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not sure I totally understand but I'll take a stab....get down to existing footing, drill and epoxy new rebar, probably 2. Add new footing, lay brick, block, whatever. If soil is undisturbed, you should not have a problem. You can add a bondbeam, and use durawall in brick as well....u do masonry?
I was always told when attaching new footing to old is not a good idea.
Chances are the footing will Settle and crack the porch. I would like to try this method.
To try to kept the cost down when I quote some of these jobs. Instead of digging a new footing
around exsiting. I have seen a few add on in the past when the new footing has sunk quit a bit. But maybe wasn't anchored together properly. Just curious how you guys tie old and new footings together.
 

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If the soil under the new footing is good then you will have no problems. Like rockmonster said drill into old footing and epoxy in some rebar to tie into the new footing. Not all footings are poured in one continuous pour. In large commercial work footings are usually poured in sections to get the bricklayers working or because one pour is just not possible. your situation is not much different. Just be careful not to undermine the existing work. That could be where the other contractors work that cracked had a problem.
 
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