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Accidental Painter
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I painted 2 units today (4200 wall sqft each) today. Spray no backroll oil based problock primer.

I used new filters in the respirator, suited up, the works.

I never smelled any fumes (but the neighbors sure did). I've never been so exhausted. No, I aint high.

Anyone have this side effect after prolonged exposure to oil paint?
 

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I painted 2 units today (4200 wall sqft each) today. Spray no backroll oil based problock primer.

I used new filters in the respirator, suited up, the works.

I never smelled any fumes (but the neighbors sure did). I've never been so exhausted. No, I aint high.

Anyone have this side effect after prolonged exposure to oil paint?
Hell yeah. It's crazy sh**. I'm sorry you're having to work with it at the moment.

One day I had a full mask on. I was spraying sanding sealer. I smelled it in my mask and was like, how? When I checked, one single strand of my long hair got in between the seal and my face. Strong and toxic.
 

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Happens to me. The best part is being able to smell the solvent on your own breath when you breathe out. You should have a headache as well, but maybe not with that particular product.
 

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Trees are Cool
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I worked in a commercial cabinet shop for a while. The spray booth had fans that blew all the fumes away. We used a particularly dangerous product and the head painter made the owner get breathing hoods. They had a positive airflow from the compressor. There was a filter to make the air OK. I know they make compressors that are safe to use for breathing.
Maybe one of these would be work for you. Another hose is a PITA, but no fumes. They were not cheap ($6-800 I think) but what are those chemicals doing to you?
 

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Accidental Painter
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I did push myself hard yesterday. I literally sprayed until i cried, then would take a ten minute break.

I had a hood & respirator but no eye protection. I bought goggles that you could turn a dial and clean, but they were worthless. So I guess the fumes made it into my system through my eyes.
 

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I got mine as Sherwin Williams. The 3M brand. http://www.nationaltoolwarehouse.co...e-P2307.aspx?gclid=CPzC4rmP_70CFa9cMgodyw8ALQ

I think I payed around that but bought extra filters and film covers. which put it somewhere near $200.00. The film protects the clear plastic of overspray. You have to change them out once in awhile. They don't cost much though.

There is a great company that will make prescription glasses to fit in to the mask so your own eyeglasses don't break the seal around your face.

I would have to dig up the name but if you're interested, just ask. You just send them your prescription and the kind of mask and they send you back these neat little glasses that fit right in to the mask. Another $100 but again, well worth it if you want to see what you are spraying.
 

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Watch that stuff. My uncle and cousin both painted indoors in spray booths at a local amusement park. They both died from brain cancer, uncle at 71, cousin at 47. Coincidence ?
I wish we could rid ourselves of all the nasty chemical paints and stains and find green alternatives. They don't hold up as well but I think worth it.
There are parts of the states and Europe that are not doing an outright ban but putting limits on the amount of VOC's that get in to our environment.
 

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yeah, I've been there when I first started. Then it takes one day in the spray room with an inadequate respirator and cover-ware and you feel freaking drugged. Our skin is our biggest organ so covering the body is essential.

I had to sit in my car for an hour that first day just waiting to feel somewhat normal.

I was pissed at my boss. He was in and out the spray room with half or no respirator until I took over. So I guess I couldn't expect him to train me right when he wasn't even doing it himself. I just fixed it fast and I have to say, I hate the chemicals but I love the art of spraying a nice piece of furniture. It's the bomb!

But the chemicals.... we need change. I've never seen any one dispose of their chemicals properly either, if there even is proper a way.
 

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What? Explain more hdavis.
Asthma, smoking cigs (he quit), paint and sheet rock dust from painting (had to brush the wall as he went - had to quit painting), heavy recreational smoker(never quit this). Basically he couldn't handle the shear volume of everything he was putting into his lungs - it can't be pegged on any one thing.

If I'm working with organic solvents, I don't drink until they clear - it would wipe my liver.
 
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