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Discussion Starter #1
hey every1,

just to say first nice site.
just after sum of your opinions really.

for the past 4 years ive worked for my dad as a workshop machinest,but ive allways longed to get in to operating heavy plant so ive finaly taken the plunge and booked my 180 degree back hoe loader excavator foundation course! :Thumbs:

at the end of the 2 week course i shud hopefully aquire my licence and go on to gain experiance working for a company.

i have had some time operating a 180 on private land so am confident on the machine but im just a little nervous about gaining on site experiance and coming across the day to day job situations on site.

maybe i could arrange a sort of apprenticeship scheme with a future employer to gain on site experiance with another driver for a few months maybe?

any replys from operators or any1 else is welcome,

thanx lee, ;)
 

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jcb ace said:
maybe i could arrange a sort of apprenticeship scheme with a future employer to gain on site experiance with another driver for a few months maybe?
Hey Ace, are you talking about running a printing press, operating earthmoving equipment or driving a truck? If it's earthmoving equipment, lose the term 'driving' right now and for goodness sake don't ask anyone if you can 'buddy up' with someone experienced for a couple of weeks. Just go in somewhere that's hiring operators and tell them you've got some experience at digging and grading. Around here, most big companies are so hard up for operators they're hiring guys who couldn't drive a tricycle much less run a machine with a modicum of safety and efficiency. If you have any kind of knack for operating equipment, here's all you need to do to quickly be one of the sought after operators:
1.) Show up everyday a half hour before starting time - warm up, wipe off and grease whatever machine you're running.
2.) Watch the guys that know what they're doing to pick-up on their operating styles and techniques.
3.) Read the operators manual if there's one in the machine
4.) Never let the machine run out of fuel.
5.) If the machine has tracks, clean them every night.
6.) If the machine is turbo charged, never shut it off before you let it idle for five minutes.
7.) Once you start the machine in the morning, don't shut it off until quitting time (unless directed otherwise).
8.) Always volunteer to work late.
9.) Never be scared of the equipment - be its boss.
10.) Always remember that the seat is the best place to stay if something goes wrong.
 

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You may want to look into working for a local municipality for a few years. Pay is adequate and bennies are usually superior. I managed to obtain a 'Heavy Equipment' operators license while working as an engineer, never can tell what one may have to do later.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
hey,

pipe guy,thanx for the good advice!

yes im talking about earthmoving plant and equipment.

i totally understand your advice about not trying to buddy up with another driver and thank u in advance for the advice.here in the uk there is also a major shortage of excavator operators.

im putting myself thru the course to get my licence,its costing me £2000 or $3500

this is simply because to work on the main sites over here u must have said licence for the company to hire u,insurance reasons.

but companys will not put people thru the course for the reason that the student will just move to another firm for better money as soon as finished.

i understand all the pointers and tips u have given,(ie) letting the turbo cool down before shuttin off etc.

i have some experiance on excavators so i can work the smoothly but have now have to learn how to grade,trench dig and so on.

thanx for the awsome advice now i cant wait to get started on my course :Thumbs:
 

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well i am new here just browsing old posts. i have been running equipment on and off for over twenty years and pieguy that is the best advice to give an apprentice operator i have ever heard...
yep being called a driver is an insult to an operator. shoot even back on the farm you wanted the boss (grandad) to finally refer to you as a tractor operator not a driver. big day when he finally called me an operator.
thanks just brought back good memories. :Thumbs:
 

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Yeah guys, there is a difference between a lever puller (driver) and what Americans call an operator.

A good operator uses his head more than the machine. It's all about Civil Engineering. You can spend a lot of money in college to learn that it is all about common sense efficiency. A good operator thinks.

And hey JCB, don't fall in love with a brand of equipment, but rather take advantage of the need for production. A good American operator can grab a Cat, JCB, JSW, Komatsu, Liebherr, John Deere, or whatever, and produce. Sorry if your name suggests product loyalty beyond practicality, which makes you eligible for citizenship in the USA. Jkg!

Dig for your worth, but dig smartly!
 
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