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My house needed a new roof. I called some friends and after a few quotes, I decided that the labor to install was more than I wanted to spend. My roof needed 25 squares and has 4 valleys. My help and I have been putting the roof on over the last few days, 5hrs here, 6 hrs there ect. and I can tell you roofing :notworthy:notworthywow. The guy I use for jack hammering, all shovel and rake work carried the bundles up the ladder so at least I didn't do any of that, to old for that anyways. He says to me today, " ya know John maybe jack hammering all day isn't so bad". The reason for this thread is to just admit that roofing is a hard trade possibly the hardest or very close to concrete work. Just my 2 cents but I would like to here what you guys think. My vote is for the concrete guys with the roofers close behind.
 

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im a full time roofer at the moment. my vote has to be roofing then concrete. atleast in concrete you have some down time. roofing you are constantly running balls to the wall. i have done a lot of concrete for weeks straight and i got pretty strong. but ive bean roofing now for 4 months 6 days a week and im an animal.:thumbup:

hey jmac i noticed you in upstate ny, ill be in albany this weekend if your within an hour i can give you a hand this weekend. if yur working on it still.
 

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KemoSabe
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I agree that roofing is brutal, but for me, I avoid it due to lack of satisfaction at the end of the day.
Every trade is taxing on the body if you push yourself to suceed. For 20 years, almost all of my work was framing new homes. I will stand firm with my opinion that framing is just as physically demanding as roofing or masonry work.
I also know tilesetters, flooring installers, siders and landscapers that leave it all out there on the jobsite everyday and have beaten themselves up severely over the years.
I guess my point in a nutshell is that the building trades industry as a whole, not being trade specific, is very demanding on the body and not everyone is cut out for it. If you're anything like me, you wouldn't have it any other way.:thumbup:
 
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The Duke
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I see crews around here all the time pack bundles up the ladder, or have the little ladder shuttle thing. I'm not sure I understand why roofing crews do not demand roof top delivery. I had to wait one day extra to get the lift for free for my shop. That alone is worth it.

The thing that kills me the most on roofs is the ankles and lower back. It is very tough work.
 

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I like Green things
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I see crews around here all the time pack bundles up the ladder, or have the little ladder shuttle thing. I'm not sure I understand why roofing crews do not demand roof top delivery. I had to wait one day extra to get the lift for free for my shop. That alone is worth it.

The thing that kills me the most on roofs is the ankles and lower back. It is very tough work.
Roof top delivery is prefered but, in my town it is hard to get a boom truck close to the house. Most people dont want you to drive over the side walk and through the yard. So the same goes for clean-up.
 

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i hate getting all my shigles boomed up at once. maybe on new contruction, but tear offs it just gets in the way. not to mention some houses ive bean on recently i wouldnt trust puttng all the shingles up their, even on the ridge. but a ladder vator is key defiently saves energy for shingleing not to mention, after ripping for 3 hours who wants to hump shingles up a ladder. defiently builds character though. ive done my fair share of humping shingles though so ill just keep using my ladder-vator
 

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i hate getting all my shigles boomed up at once. maybe on new contruction, but tear offs it just gets in the way. not to mention some houses ive bean on recently i wouldnt trust puttng all the shingles up their, even on the ridge. but a ladder vator is key defiently saves energy for shingleing not to mention, after ripping for 3 hours who wants to hump shingles up a ladder. defiently builds character though. ive done my fair share of humping shingles though so ill just keep using my ladder-vator

you a doubts about the roof taking the weight? How is it any different once the new shingles are installed? Still the same weight.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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you a doubts about the roof taking the weight? How is it any different once the new shingles are installed? Still the same weight.
Point loads are what he is concerned about.




Roofing is tough for sure but for me it's mostly because of the body positions. The ankles take a beating but if ya sit on one cheek and scoot along the twisted posture gets me. If I stand and hunch over well everything hurts. Yeah it is tough on an aging sole.

Hardest work I ever did, that being the one that seemed to burn the most calories, installing oak flooring in new homes. I got 30 cents a foot and hauled ass. My personal record was 600 ft in one long summer day. That was tough. But I was about 25 yrs old.
 

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GC
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I would put roofing above concrete. You ever roof 6 days in a row 10 hours a day? Hot mop a roof in 100 degree heat? Alot of trades are very demanding on your body. Today had one of my guy's brown coating under a balcony and decided to help him out as it was HOT. Underhangs suck could not imagine doing that 6 days a week.
 

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Did a 32' x 32' roof a few months ago, sheathing and ( I was lucky ) Aluminum roof:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
I must admit the ankles weren't used to that, I had hot sun and rain coming down that week.
Roofers have it tough:notworthy

Forgot to mention I was using a bucket truck for part of it to:clap:
 

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I agree that roofing is brutal, but for me, I avoid it due to lack of satisfaction at the end of the day.
Every trade is taxing on the body if you push yourself to suceed. For 20 years, almost all of my work was framing new homes. I will stand firm with my opinion that framing is just as physically demanding as roofing or masonry work.
I also know tilesetters, flooring installers, siders and landscapers that leave it all out there on the jobsite everyday and have beaten themselves up severely over the years.
I guess my point in a nutshell is that the building trades industry as a whole, not being trade specific, is very demanding on the body and not everyone is cut out for it. If you're anything like me, you wouldn't have it any other way.:thumbup:

All the more reason to make sure you are chargin top dollar. Yer body aint going to last as long as those trades that are less demanding.
 

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I did some HOD carrieng when I was 20 (plasterers bioch) that was the hardest work I ever did, we set the scafolding, shoveled 50 sand and 3 80pound bags, mixed it then wheelbarrowed it and shoveled it usualy overhead to the table......thank god for eifs coming in style. After 6 months of that i went on the wall for 3 years and I still have problems 20 years later holding my left arm up, and my right wrist pops alot from all that trowling.

Roofing is hell on the ankles and back and is why i cant swing a hammer these days and have went to metal so I can run a screwgun instead but trust me spending all day on a reflective roof sucks a55 as well, least im tan all year who cares if it hurts to stand up straight or sleep on my back, right least i have good reason to only do my gal doggystyle :clap:
 
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