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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had employees now for 1 1/2 years... they are all great guys and I feel like I have a great crew working for me. Yesterday one of my guys got careless and didn't brace a truss properly and it broke beyond repair? Should the business eat it or should it come out of employees pay?
 

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nextlevelconstr said:
I have had employees now for 1 1/2 years... they are all great guys and I feel like I have a great crew working for me. Yesterday one of my guys got careless and didn't brace a truss properly and it broke beyond repair? Should the business eat it or should it come out of employees pay?
The business's pays for it. Train your employees
 

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nextlevelconstr said:
I have had employees now for 1 1/2 years... they are all great guys and I feel like I have a great crew working for me. Yesterday one of my guys got careless and didn't brace a truss properly and it broke beyond repair? Should the business eat it or should it come out of employees pay?
Cost of doing business . You pay for it .
 

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owners break things too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for the responses. Just as I thought. I had others telling me otherwise. My guys know what they are doing. This is the first time something like this has happened and wanted to get others feedback... I appreciate it. Thanks!!!
 

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I really have my doubts you would be allowed to "charge" your employee for damage anyway...even if it was intentional. Fire him, sure...make him pay for it (unless you sue him and win, which is a totally different matter), no.

Check the labor laws where you are, but I wouldn't try it without asking your lawyer and knowing for SURE it's allowed.
 

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:thumbsup: I wouldn't either. But if I was going to, I'd want to make sure the law was on my side...but I don't think it will be on his side.

There are only a few reasons you can deduct money from an employee's paycheck (aside from taxes....G don't care if G gets the money :) )
 

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Even if the loss was caused by blatant employee misconduct,you pay---

I had an employee get drunk and really screwed up---still my dime---

It does sound like you have a good crew----chalk it up as overhead,training--whatever and be glad you have decent help---
 

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Many years ago I was driving the boss's truck and was stopped for a "routine" check. I received a ticket for lack of safety markers. When I got back to the shop I handed the ticket to the boss as it was his truck even though the ticket was made out to me. He told me it was my responsibility and I argued and he finally did pay the ticket. Mind you I was 18 and this was my first real job.
I now know that it was indeed my responsibility as I was driving and should have checked the truck. However, at the time, I was not aware of this. The boss should have made me aware of said responsibility and trained me as to how to check the truck prior to taking it on the road.
My point - As employers we need to properly train any employees and make them aware of what is required / expected of them. And to that end we must take the time it takes to instill this in the employees.
 

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Many years ago I was driving the boss's truck and was stopped for a "routine" check. I received a ticket for lack of safety markers. When I got back to the shop I handed the ticket to the boss as it was his truck even though the ticket was made out to me. He told me it was my responsibility and I argued and he finally did pay the ticket. Mind you I was 18 and this was my first real job.
I now know that it was indeed my responsibility as I was driving and should have checked the truck. However, at the time, I was not aware of this. The boss should have made me aware of said responsibility and trained me as to how to check the truck prior to taking it on the road.
My point - As employers we need to properly train any employees and make them aware of what is required / expected of them. And to that end we must take the time it takes to instill this in the employees.
As true as that may be, the money end of it is still on the employER. The case of you driving the truck is different. There was no damage to repair (I.E.-pay for). Fines levied against YOU are not your employers problem, even if it's an equipment violation on his vehicle.

If you had gotten into an accident with his truck, he couldn't have made you pay to repair it. His choices are: Fire you for damaging company property, or not fire you and chalk it up to cost of doing business.
 

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Jim
I did say that I was responsible for the fine. I said that at the time it happened I did not know that I was responsible. I learned this later.
My point was that I was a new employee and should have been "trained" ( for lack of a better word) as to what I was expected to do and be responsible for. I was given the keys and told to do something. Trying to be a good employee I did as I was told.
I myself as an employer have failed to take the time to let a new employee know things that we sometimes take for granted.
 

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I had a former employer tell me once "It doesn't matter whose fault it is, it's always my fault"

You are responsible for your guys and if it really was one of those occasional accidents then you eat the cost and let your guy know that he should have learned from the mistake.
 

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Many years ago I was driving the boss's truck and was stopped for a "routine" check. I received a ticket for lack of safety markers. When I got back to the shop I handed the ticket to the boss as it was his truck even though the ticket was made out to me. He told me it was my responsibility and I argued and he finally did pay the ticket. Mind you I was 18 and this was my first real job.
I now know that it was indeed my responsibility as I was driving and should have checked the truck. However, at the time, I was not aware of this. The boss should have made me aware of said responsibility and trained me as to how to check the truck prior to taking it on the road.
My point - As employers we need to properly train any employees and make them aware of what is required / expected of them. And to that end we must take the time it takes to instill this in the employees.
When you say lack of safety markers what do you mean?
 
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