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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
this might be considered a diy question so don't laugh.:laughing:

Anyways I'm a commercial electrical apprentice but have a framing question. I was thinking the other day about something an old boss of mine once said. He told me he framed my parents detached 20'x40' garage by himself.

It's a slab with 3 courses of block set around the perimeter then stick framed 9' high 2x4 walls set on top. I noticed he had a 2x6 bottom plate however.

Now I'm in the middle of a basic framing class I'm taking at night at a local tech school for fun. I understand some basic wall framing.

What I can't figure out is how someone stands a wall on top of the three courses of block. Its easy when platform framing or on a slab. I've skimmed over several framing books at the library and haven't seen any that touch on this.

My brother's attracted garage is built similarly...three courses of block then the wall framing.

Do you simply tack on a toe kick on the outside of the sill plate, lift the bottom plate of the wall up onto the sill and push the wall up like normal? :whistling
 

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Oh the things we did in our youth...:thumbup::laughing:

How did we do it?.....

All depended on how many bowls of Wheaties I had that morning or how sore my back was....:whistling:thumbup:
 

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Do you simply tack on a toe kick on the outside of the sill plate, lift the bottom plate of the wall up onto the sill and push the wall up like normal? :whistling
Or you just set up saw horses and build it 3' off the floor. You can also spike the bottom plate to the sill before you stand it up. Working alone, you don't want anything to have a chance to get away from you.
 

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If it is a big wall, I just cut a dozen or so 2x6 the same height as the stem off the slab, and make a "T" out of pairs, so they don't fall over. Stand them on end, then frame and sheet the wall right on top of them. Kick stands essentially. Then your wall jacks slide under w/o lifting. Nudge the wall forward or backward to the sill plate w/o lifting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
never considered saw horses. figured that would be a pain if you had 40' of wall. I know you can frame and raise it in whatever lengths you want but longer continuous plates would yield a stronger wall, no?

still seems rough doing it solo. Maybe it was just a tall tale and he had a laborer that day?
 

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never considered saw horses. figured that would be a pain if you had 40' of wall. I know you can frame and raise it in whatever lengths you want but longer continuous plates would yield a stronger wall, no?
You still have plate material that's shorter than 40' - they aren't really continuous, they're in sections.
 

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If he did it I am sure he did it in sections. Build a section then set the bottom plate up on the block wall then flip it up into place. Its slow and a PITA but can be done. You can also pre-nail a brace onto the wall before you lift it then nail the bottom of the brace off to a stake to have quick control of the wall. The real question you should ask Mr. Super Carpenter is how did he lift and install the roof trusses by himself??
 

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If he did it I am sure he did it in sections. Build a section then set the bottom plate up on the block wall then flip it up into place. Its slow and a PITA but can be done. You can also pre-nail a brace onto the wall before you lift it then nail the bottom of the brace off to a stake to have quick control of the wall. The real question you should ask Mr. Super Carpenter is how did he lift and install the roof trusses by himself??
Violates handling restrictions, but slide one end up to the top of the wall from the ground - do that for about all the trusses, then get up top and slide them over. Helps if you have an interior wall or two in the right places.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No trusses. This was built back in the early 80's. 2x12 joists 16oc with I believe 2x8 rafters. Standard gable. I'd say an 8/12 to 10/12 pitch if I was to guess.

There are no holes or repairs in the concrete slab either so he must have braced the walls from the outside as well
 

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Stoneyard said:
Is there an interior wall the joists break on or did he use 20' 2x12s? Ahhh, so he stick framed it by himself... Did he use the sky hook to hold up the ridge board and several boxes of toenails?
It's not that hard.....
 

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this might be considered a diy question so don't laugh.:laughing:

Anyways I'm a commercial electrical apprentice but have a framing question. I was thinking the other day about something an old boss of mine once said. He told me he framed my parents detached 20'x40' garage by himself.

It's a slab with 3 courses of block set around the perimeter then stick framed 9' high 2x4 walls set on top. I noticed he had a 2x6 bottom plate however.

Now I'm in the middle of a basic framing class I'm taking at night at a local tech school for fun. I understand some basic wall framing.

What I can't figure out is how someone stands a wall on top of the three courses of block. Its easy when platform framing or on a slab. I've skimmed over several framing books at the library and haven't seen any that touch on this.

My brother's attracted garage is built similarly...three courses of block then the wall framing.

Do you simply tack on a toe kick on the outside of the sill plate, lift the bottom plate of the wall up onto the sill and push the wall up like normal? :whistling
do you have a picture? I could do it . but I need to see it to figure out how.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
No interior walls. 20' 2x12 16 oc for the ceiling joists.

Like I said I'm sure he must have either busted his balls or had a hand.
Being a sparky I thought maybe I was just over looking the obvious. Thought there was some smooth carpentry trick I was over thinking or unaware of.

It's just a question that I've been wanting to ask for awhile.
 

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No interior walls. 20' 2x12 16 oc for the ceiling joists.

Like I said I'm sure he must have either busted his balls or had a hand.
This is very doable. It isn't as much extra work for one person as you'd think - you're still only lifting half the board weight (one end at a time), whether it's 2 people or one person except when you move it from the cut area into place to bring it up.
 

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Wussies,
Crap, I almost framed my whole house by myself.
Called a few friends to help slide the triple 1 3/4X16" x24' microlam in place, but other than that mostly myself.
Walls, 2x6. Joists, 2 1/4" x16" TrusJoists. Two thirds 24', one third 36'.

Roof was trussed and I had the crane set the different packages on their respective walls then me and another guy walked them out.
I sheathed the whole roof myself, as in lifting every sheet of 5/8 DF CDX up by myself. Total roof area was approx. 30 sqs.

This was 20 years ago when I was a lot dumber:laughing:

Actually back then Fine Homebuilding had a lengthy article in one of their issues that specifically addressed framing alone. That article was a treasure trove of good ideas that I put to use.
 

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It is trickier than framing on a slab or the deck for sure. I did a 2x6 wall, 28' long, with 1 door and 2, 4' wide window openings, with me and 1 other guy. :eek: That was tough. Especially lifting it onto the anchor bolts. :eek: :eek:


We just lifted the bottom plate onto the block wall, then stood the sombich up. :eek:



Delta
 
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