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Anyone have any comments on a totally electric house and running one of these electric tankless water heaters. I am looking at a 200 amp service pannel. But the water heater requires 3 40amp double pole breakers. For the load calc the manual says you can use 47 amps because it is not on all the time. Sure seems like in the summer with the ac going the wife cooking and I go take a shower there goes the lights. Anyone have this setup or installed in a new house. Not completely sold on the water heater yet.
 

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When the power goes down and you have a 'tankless' sytem, do you have any hot water?
If gas is available I wouldn't have anything but. I like fire when it comes to making heat.
 

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200 amps just may be tight, what is your furance rated? That would be my concern. I would opt for gas in water heating anytime over electric, and taking up 6 spaces in a panel dosen't leave room for other things that you need
 

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I would caution you about tankless water heaters unless you have totally familiarized yourself with the pros and cons. There are issues with them that you may realize only after living with it if you don't take the time to find out before. Lots of people complain about capacity, the common complaint is that the manufacturers numbers are way biased and not based on real world uses. Capacity may be great for taking a shower, but add the dishwasher going on, or the kids taking a shower at the same time... system failure. Adding the real capacity usually makes the system too expensive. Break down usually also comes up as an issue with people talking about having to wait 1-2 weeks for a replacement part. 1-2 weeks without hot water? Hot water tanks are a tried and true idiot proof system that is gallon per gallon cheaper when you take real life circumstances in to consideration. You can also get a replacement installed the same day. When they break they go gradually, when tankless breaks it is like throwing a switch.

Just some thoughts, I hope you fully understand the pros and cons so if you do decide to go tankless you go into it with both eyes wide open.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
tankless

The wife does not like the gas co. here. They raise the rates 20-40% every year we are up to .85 cents per cf. I know the tide could change and electric could go higher. Also the gas co wants 18.00 a month to have service even if you don't use 1cf. That is why are ventless fireplace was scraped and replaced with a wood burning. Anyway will keep it in mind and may end up with gas furnace and hot water tank. Sure would free up some room to ad a workshop on the electric pannel later on.
 

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The General said:
Sure would free up some room to ad a workshop on the electric pannel later on.
There ya' go! :Thumbs:
 

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I have wondered about these things for years, how much energy do they really save? Obviously they are dormant when hot water is not required but that meter must look like a gyro when it kicks on. If I get some spare time I'll run the numbers, heating water on the fly has got to be expensive and restrictive.
 

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I roughly figured. ABEC 11 bearings in the meter. A ME joke.
 

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Mike Finley said:
I would caution you about tankless water heaters unless you have totally familiarized yourself with the pros and cons. There are issues with them that you may realize only after living with it if you don't take the time to find out before. Lots of people complain about capacity, the common complaint is that the manufacturers numbers are way biased and not based on real world uses. Capacity may be great for taking a shower, but add the dishwasher going on, or the kids taking a shower at the same time... system failure. Adding the real capacity usually makes the system too expensive. Break down usually also comes up as an issue with people talking about having to wait 1-2 weeks for a replacement part. 1-2 weeks without hot water? Hot water tanks are a tried and true idiot proof system that is gallon per gallon cheaper when you take real life circumstances in to consideration. You can also get a replacement installed the same day. When they break they go gradually, when tankless breaks it is like throwing a switch.

Just some thoughts, I hope you fully understand the pros and cons so if you do decide to go tankless you go into it with both eyes wide open.
Mike, I hope you don't mind me asking your opinion. I have a workshop in a barn. I have been considering on demand hot water. This would probably be needed less then ten minutes a day on average, and if it broke down going weeks would not be a hardship. Would I save much money over a regular hot water heater and a good blanket?

Jim Bunton
 

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Paintr, I can't think of a better application for tankless. I assume that it never freezes in there.
 

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It sounds like because of your small capacity use that it would be a good fit, however as for saving money? You sound like all you need is one of those small 20 gallon under counter water heaters which are even cheaper and use even less gas or electricity to run, so the break even point because of the high initial cost of the tankless may still be 10 years or more.
 

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You can get even smaller tank types that are used in RV's and boats.
 
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