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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I tried the search feature and there isn't much there and what is, is dated.

Has anyone used Dryvit or have experience with it? How hard is it to install? I'm guessing its almost an art in itself like many other things

Basically I'm building a new garage, and down the road, maybe even 5 years, I'd like to build a new house here as well and I'm going to use ICFs for the walls, and I'd like to use cultured stone on the bottom 4' or so, and then either something like Dryvit or stucco or even vertical cement board siding for the top.

Thoughts? Dryvit over kill since the ICF wall will already have the XPS insulation?

The ICFs will be something new for me as well. Right now I'm considering: Reward, Fox blocks, Quadlock, Nudura, Logix..... I'm tired of burning through $2000-$2500 worth of oil a year for this little house we bought for the property!

Who knows, maybe I'll learn something and be able to offer a new service down the road.
 

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The two biggest probelms with ICF is the Thermal Mass is behind 50% of your foam----# 2 foam insulation will kill everyone in the house in even a 'small' fire from the smoke developed....

You could use a hybrid form system, ICF exterior forms, old school metal/wood pans on the inside..

Dryvit etc... are plasticsized stuccos, Dryvit products are very consistant color wise bucket to bucket.... Even low skilled illegal workers can achieve presentable results.
Just make sure you've flashed and drained properly under any non-porous stuccos. "Black mold from faulty EIFS jobs......"
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I understand the downfall with the ICF smoke, although I was planning on using 5/8" drywall, which I would think that would help slow things down to that point that you would be able to leave the structure safely but like any fire there are a lot of variables that play into it. I do think the trade off of a tighter seal and better air quality outweigh the risk of a fire to begin with though.

I also believe that with the newer standards and technologies that are being used, houses are less likely to have a fire to begin with but that's just my opinion. My logic is the wiring methods being used are much safer then the materials and practices from many years ago. A very well sealed house from something like spray foam or ICFs or SIPs are less likely to get rodents inside chewing on wiring. The only real constant that you have to worry about is that some people are idiots but what can ya do?

I appreciate the reply.
 

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Your doctor's or nurse's mistakes(100,000 dead every year) is much more likely to kill you or yours than a house fire, But its your call on the products your house is made out of....

Why not place the 2" of foam outside? R 20 + walls and every three ft of wall adding a ton of usable thermal mass to even out the house's climate?
 

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Fairly easy to apply being that the system is self gauging. The main things are proper flashing and not stopping or the material will "burn". So apply the finish coat corner to corner or you will see the start/stop point.
 

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Eifs not a fan of! For several reasons. With that said brown coat on the job I'm on has Portland added to the dryvit. Several counties in my area and some townships have banned stucco. Mostly because of the extreme difficulty of water proofing referred to as a sealed system. I suggest real/ true masonry. Proven to stand the test of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Your doctor's or nurse's mistakes(100,000 dead every year) is much more likely to kill you or yours than a house fire, But its your call on the products your house is made out of....

Why not place the 2" of foam outside? R 20 + walls and every three ft of wall adding a ton of usable thermal mass to even out the house's climate?
Not sure I follow with the point of every 3' adding a ton of thermal mass but I could be overthinking it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
stucco may not be 100% waterproof but nothing is. if you install dimple board or proper drainage mat like some of the graco house wrap, then you shouldn't have any issues but the key there is doing it right.
 

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stucco may not be 100% waterproof but nothing is. if you install dimple board or proper drainage mat like some of the graco house wrap, then you shouldn't have any issues but the key there is doing it right.
Well, I must add one of the other reasons I recommend real/true masonry over stucco. Let's take your stucco wall hit it with an object let's say a hammer or even bump into it with your ridding mower. And apply the same force to a brick veneer,cmu, or a stone veneer. One will surely fail before the other. Just another reason not a fan of stucco. Good luck waterproofing a product to date I've never seen installed with an air space and venting. Test of time says true/real masonry is the only way to go. But I'm a Mason could be a little bias.
 

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Put a ton of the stuff on from all of the differant manufactures.not a huge fan of the product on large walls looks to store front looking ,looks best done in panels and bands on homes.if any work is being done below 6ft. At ground level I would recomend using impact mesh for the brown coat.you can actually throw a brick at the product without pucturing it.product is very high to maintain and needs painted every couple years(it's a dirt magnet).as far as the finish goes use a heavy swirl or freebase textures,stay away from the light sand textures they show the most imperfections.and yes make sure all of the wall is flashed properly.think veener stone is a better choice for looks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well high maintenance certainly isn't something I'm looking for. I just want something different that the other 100 houses below me.

I've never been a big fan of bricks for the entire house. That's why I am certainly open to suggestions but I will most likely end up using cement siding vertically.

As for something hitting the wall and cracking it, I really don't see that as much of an issue because as I said I am planning on using veneer on the bottom and some of those veneer or cultured stone holds up fairly well.

Now if I could only learn how to use Chief Architect or something similar I'd be in good shape. I've never been good at drawing and trying to convince my fiancé of my ideas based off my drawings, usually doesn't work.
 

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Drgrafix, Three foot of 8' basement wall @ 8" thick = 5/9ths yard of concrete = 2000 lbs. of masonry to even out temp changes if its INSIDE the insulation shell. And your house is 4" bigger in both directions(thousands of dollars of space for "free").
 

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Honestly I don't like EIFS on houses. It looks incredibly commercial to me, and even though it isn't cheap, it just looks that way.

That said, in moderation and with the right color it can compliment veneer or siding, but it needs to be thought out a bit.

Going over ICF is a cake walk provided you braced the walls properly during the pour. With wavy walls though you are going to be hating life spending days sanding with 6 foot board.
 
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