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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a cement block home in Florida which was build in the 60's. I am about to get a new stucco finish put on. On the side of the house with the west exposure the afternoon sun really heats it up. I was considering having my installer use eifss on the side for the insulation factor. Its also the front of the house so was hoping to get a bit more creative with the design. One of my questions is I do believe you are not suppose to run the efis down to the ground? If not, what the best way to finish the bottom? In my situation half would be down to concrete sidewalk and the other half down to mulch. So I'd like to here some pros and cons of doing using the eifs. If it can be used with no problems I'd like to try it.
 

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I have a cement block home in Florida which was build in the 60's. I am about to get a new stucco finish put on. On the side of the house with the west exposure the afternoon sun really heats it up. I was considering having my installer use efis on the side for the insulation factor. Its also the front of the house so was hoping to get a bit more creative with the design. One of my questions is I do believe you are not suppose to run the efis down to the ground? If not, what the best way to finish the bottom? In my situation half would be down to concrete sidewalk and the other half down to mulch. So I'd like to here some pros and cons of doing using the efis. If it can be used with no problems I'd like to try it.

hard stucco the bottom and use the same finish. stop the eifs a few inches from the grade level.
 

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I think because it is block you could get away with a smaller gap.

They don't want water to migrate up and under the foam on a stick built house.

Thats what I was thinking as long as thats an acceptable solution. you think there would be any problems at the stucco to efis joint?
Even if it did seperate and you used the same finish you probably wouldn't even notice. That finish is pretty tenacious, I had it on clothes that wore out long before the finish even started to come off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
The house has R30 in the attic. And 3/4 Tuff R on the interior. The west facing gets full sun from about 1pm until sunset. After sunset you can feel the heat coming off the block for a quite some time. I figured since I'm stuccoing anyway it wouldn't hurt to use the eifs on that side to help with that. Seems like its a good option.
 

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As long as you don't live next to a golf course. ;)

I say this half jokingly & half serious. I play at a course where one of the houses looks like it belongs in Syria. It has about 50 holes on the side of the house where it faces the tee box.
 

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The biggest issue with the EIFS in close proximity to grade is moisture. The finish coat will eventually delaminate.

The sidewalk area would be fine so long as it isn't a big splash back area. Otherwise you will likely experience delamination.

The mulch area should be held above grade, but if you have decent overhangs and the area immediately against the house stays dry it can be very close to grade. You can create a small swale with the mulch to disguise the bottom of the EIFS.

Hard coat covered with the EIFS finish coat isn't completely immune to similar delamination.

Keeping the EIFS finish coat dry until it has fully set up is paramount to achieving the best bond. If it gets rained on or splashed upon within 24 hours the finish may be compromised.
 

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I guess I am not understanding the point of needing EIFS. If you are going for a better R value then just use a foam, wire, and traditional stucco system.

I like EIFS and I know it's advantages, but I don't see you getting any more R value than stucco.

Maybe I missed something.
 

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I guess I am not understanding the point of needing EIFS. If you are going for a better R value then just use a foam, wire, and traditional stucco system.

I like EIFS and I know it's advantages, but I don't see you getting any more R value than stucco.

Maybe I missed something.
I see an advantage if he wants to get a little creative with the design by adding quoins or window surrounds.

I agree with your main point. Still I wonder if the thermal mass of the EIFS being lower provides better thermal characteristics?
 
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