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Neo really enjoyed the last debate :thumbup: so let's not debate this one so vigorously.

Let's shoot for a good discussion and not too many replies back and forth to each other but to the topic.

I read this article when it came out and we started to really work on using less material than we have to structurally. So we started ladder blocking and using up smaller scraps for backing etc. And didn't like it. The drywallers didn't like and neither did the trim carps.

What is your experience with the subject in the link? Maybe take it a step beyond the article and what would/do you do to make a more efficient use of materials? But that is practical to your area or methods.

Wide open topic, but lets anchor it at efficiently using framing materials.

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/pages/efficient-framing-interactive/index.asp

On our last frame we filled up 3/4 or so the flatbed with all the garbage and then had a pile of wood scrap that a friend takes and burns. That included the siding as well. We through away wood that is 12" or less and try and use everything else in a way that makes sense, not to just use it or we are wasting nails and labor.
 

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KemoSabe
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One thing that would make sense to me at the material production level would be T&G decking that actually FINISHED at 48" coverage. I cant tell you how many 28' wide buildings I've framed. The decking ends up 3.5" short and I end up spending an hour making tounges on 4" rips with a router to finish it up.
I think building in 4' increments makes sense as far as framing lumber and sheathing, but the decking is the missing link.:thumbsup:
 

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I am not in favor of most of those ideas. Seems like a step backwards in some regards. 25 years ago, we sheathed most walls with foam. I never liked the stability of those walls. Going to 2x6 on 24 inch centers has a few downsides. 1/2 inch drywall on a wall would be more likely to suffer damage from kids/ pets/ etc. My brother once pushed me through drywall that was on 24 inch centers. We do however use the "L" corners as much as possible. I am a big fan of blocking between studs at partitions as well. Some of the inspectors here do not like it for some reason though. I don't like the idea of no jacks at some doors and windows. Double stud here helps keep things stronger and straighter and if your using wide casing, its nice to nail closer to the edge. I like the idea of using up and sorting scrap. I have worked for a builer who use to separate and recycle a lot of his. Less to pay for dump fees as well.
 

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KemoSabe
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When doing make-up for wall parts, I like to use the jack cut-offs to make interior corners and pars. We used to do exteriors this way to, but now use "California" corners and pars on exterior walls.
 

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Lone.

Whenever I get to the point where the last piece is like 4-5 inches, I use as many tongues as we can find. I also frequently use a groove to groove assembly, using glue to form a "tongue". This way I don't waste a lot of material. I have been doing this for 15 years and have never had a problem with it. I wouldn't do it on a larger piece however as I don't know how well this would hold up under foot traffic.
 

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KemoSabe
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Lone.

Whenever I get to the point where the last piece is like 4-5 inches, I use as many tongues as we can find. I also frequently use a groove to groove assembly, using glue to form a "tongue". This way I don't waste a lot of material. I have been doing this for 15 years and have never had a problem with it. I wouldn't do it on a larger piece however as I don't know how well this would hold up under foot traffic.
I worry about heavy pieces of furniture close to the wall, possibly pushing the edge of the sheet down, maybe I'm overthinking it.:shutup::thumbsup:
 
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Occasionally, if my cutoff rips on the first deck are large, I will store them and use them to start the second floor deck. Sometimes you still end up with a tiny rip there if the decks are the same depth.
 

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KemoSabe
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Occasionally, if my cutoff rips on the first deck are large, I will store them and use them to start the second floor deck. Sometimes you still end up with a tiny rip there if the decks are the same depth.
Yep, I've done just as many 22'ers that I did just that. Start the next floor with the leftover. Problem is, now I have a 5" rip at the other end.:rolleyes:
 

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I usually have the laborer store all of the small blocks in a closet out of the way somewhere. Usually we have one spot on each floor for these blocks. Keeps em out of the way of not only us but the other subs as well. One thing I don't do is get stressed out about every piece of scrap on day one. I have seen guys do this, and they just end up with a house that is all pieced in and takes longer to frame. No big deal if after the first couple of days you have a lot of 4-5 foot pieces of various widths. As long as you keep them stacked up and know where they are, you can quickly grab them when you need them.
 

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Heres one that may sound dumb at first. When selecting 2x4 cleats/walkboards for roof sheathing, don't use the crappy, crooked, twisted ones. Plan on using these after the roofer removes them. If you use all the junk for this, you will have to use this junk somewhere down the line. Only so many truss braces that you can use the crappy ones for.
 

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KemoSabe
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Years ago, a man used to stop at our jobsite to get window cutouts and other scraps to make yard decorations for various holidays. I always felt good about the fact that it wasn't going to waste. Wish I could find more guys like that.:sad:
 

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strat hd
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The decking ends up 3.5" short and I end up spending an hour making tounges on 4" rips with a router to finish it up.


Fifteen years ago I framed for a big outfit here and they supplied 1x4 for this situation. As there was'nt much scrap decking left. With a lot of glue applied between the 1x4 and the 3/4 osb. They also gave a map to sheet (sheathe, sheer) LOL the roof. 1st row cutoff on the right fills in second row left and so forth. Which is standard. But they had every piece accounted for. Not all the pieces jogged. Sometimes a cut off would go in the middle somewhere. Ladder blocking for partitions. Foam board on the walls with 1 sheet of osb on each end.

The map thing sucked,they actually had it drawn out to show where each piece went. After framing one of their houses your scrap pile was a pile of sawdust. :laughing: They actually designed their house around material loss.

Interior walls were close to 8', 12' and 16' lenths to reduce drywall scrap. Guess it works well for them they have been around 30 or 40 years and are still going at it in three or four states.

They also cut corners by not paying subs very much. But that's another story.
 

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KemoSabe
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Are you framing 2x6 walls?
If you are, what difference does it make it, :eek:it just a scrap under the walls
All the buildings I've framed over the last 25 years were 2x4 walls with the exception of maybe 3 or 4. The 28' width puts the edge of the sheet even to the edge of the plate.:thumbsup:
 

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solar guy
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Lone.

Whenever I get to the point where the last piece is like 4-5 inches, I use as many tongues as we can find. I also frequently use a groove to groove assembly, using glue to form a "tongue". This way I don't waste a lot of material. I have been doing this for 15 years and have never had a problem with it. I wouldn't do it on a larger piece however as I don't know how well this would hold up under foot traffic.
The hardwood floor people make a spline that is basically a small tongue that is twice as wide a normal tongue. Maybe slip one of those in and reverse the last sheet. Add some gorilla glue if you feel the need.
 

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Design Build
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I heard a wise old man say this one time so I will no doubt butcher it here.

But as far as being some kind of environmental tree huggin' builder - I tend to go the other way and overbuild. Then when my structure lasts for 100 years, I believe that my "eco-impact" is truly the "greenest" over time.

Built solid. Built right. Built to last.

Unless the dollars are coming out of my pocket, I will never waste a second to build to the absolute last scraps of materials.
 

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KemoSabe
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wonder how they meet the energy code.
Depends upon the percentage of glazing, U-value, ceiling and floor insulation and HDD, but R-13 in walls is still acceptable under certain conditions in all NJ counties that I work in.
 

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Jeff
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Depends upon the percentage of glazing, U-value, ceiling and floor insulation and HDD, but R-13 in walls is still acceptable under certain conditions in all NJ counties that I work in.
I never understood we need to build to R-21 in walls but guys put cheap ass windows in a wall with 5/8 pane. R-49 in residential ceilings but only 19 in commercial ceilings. It seems to me a huge commercial building with 12' ceilings would have a heck of a lot more heat loss than residential.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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When doing make-up for wall parts, I like to use the jack cut-offs to make interior corners and pars. We used to do exteriors this way to, but now use "California" corners and pars on exterior walls.
Apologies effendi, but may your armpits be infested with the fleas of a thousand camels. What mean these strange terms?
 
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