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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a job coming up next week and I'm trying to find the best way to join 3/4".
The job is trimming out a sun room with shadow boxes, chair rail, new base and casing. One wall is all brick, with a doorway, so I was planning on glueing 3/4'' good one side plywood ( with taps cons placed along the bottom and top where trim will cover the screw heads ) along that wall. The sheets will be ripped around 35" with a 1" thick cap on top to bring total height around 36" from the floor.
The plywood is basically just a nailing surface for the baseboard, shadow boxes and the built up chair rail ( casing up side down, with a very small crown and a pine/poplar top cap with a bull nose )
Since the wall is around 25' long with a doorway. I will have 2.5 sheets on one side of the door and small piece on the other.
My question is which is the best way to edge join the three pieces of plywood together ?? Pocket screws, Biscuits or a Spline are three options I've came up with, I'm just curious if anyone has had success/failures with either of these methods, and which method is the preferred choice.
 

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I've used biscuits with pocket screws, it did work. Had to be real carful tightening the screws.

I now use Dominos with fewer pocket screws.

Tom
 

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carpenter123 said:
I have a job coming up next week and I'm trying to find the best way to join 3/4". The job is trimming out a sun room with shadow boxes, chair rail, new base and casing. One wall is all brick, with a doorway, so I was planning on glueing 3/4'' good one side plywood ( with taps cons placed along the bottom and top where trim will cover the screw heads ) along that wall. The sheets will be ripped around 35" with a 1" thick cap on top to bring total height around 36" from the floor. The plywood is basically just a nailing surface for the baseboard, shadow boxes and the built up chair rail ( casing up side down, with a very small crown and a pine/poplar top cap with a bull nose ) Since the wall is around 25' long with a doorway. I will have 2.5 sheets on one side of the door and small piece on the other. My question is which is the best way to edge join the three pieces of plywood together ?? Pocket screws, Biscuits or a Spline are three options I've came up with, I'm just curious if anyone has had success/failures with either of these methods, and which method is the preferred choice.
Perfect excuse to buy a domino.
 

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Pocket screws and biscuits would be nice probably. Biscuits for alignment. I've done biscuits, and I've done a spline, haven't done pockets screws yet because the only time I've joined plywood has been for custom making an refrigerator end panel in an old house with a weird ceiling height. Didn't want the pocket screws visible.
 

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Look at you Festool crazies going to town!! :laughing:

The amount of times that I have a job to do and think "man I wish I had a Domino" just keep growing...
 

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I've never had pocket screws visible when I place the on the back side.

Tom
Another duh moment... I'm guessing you'd put the seam at the top where the cabinet over the fridge hides it?

I didn't have pocket screw capability last time but we're on another job that I'm making a panel for which I will now use pocket screws on.
 

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Use a slot cutter & spline the entire height. Cut both slots, butt plywood & attatch to the wall, then drive the spline in from the top to align the 2 sheets.


 

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Still likely it won't be a pretty joint. Personally, I'd cover the joint with a piece of moulding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the tips everyone. I checked out a domino and those things look sweet but it is definitely not in the budget yet haha.
I like the idea of biscuits and pocket screws because it can be done quickly, and I have the tools to do it.
I have tried to work the layout of the shadow boxes to be over a seam but it just wont work.
My plan was to join all the pieces on the floor, glue the back, and stand them up in place. I just hope it goes as easy as it does on paper haha.
thanks again for the help.
 

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I'd be inclined to use the slot cutter and pocket screws and make up one big panel if that's possible. You'd have a much better joint than trying to add them together on the wall.
 

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If you're gonna use spline I would join them on the wall, 25' is too long to try to join and put up as one unit.

Personally in your situation I would do like pin said and put the up so they're evenly spaced with a nice piece of molding on each splice.

All that's if I didn't have a domino, but I do so I'd just use the domino and call it a day... Buy one, you won't regret it.
 

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If you're gonna use spline I would join them on the wall, 25' is too long to try to join and put up as one unit.

Personally in your situation I would do like pin said and put the up so they're evenly spaced with a nice piece of molding on each splice.

All that's if I didn't have a domino, but I do so I'd just use the domino and call it a day... Buy one, you won't regret it.
How are you drawing the joint tight on the wall though? You should be able to make it where the joint is invisible which would be nice IMO. It also depends on how many hands you have. I could have 4 guys plus my dad if we needed so I'd at least give it a shot just cause IMO it would look better that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Deckhead - I agree, 25 feet is too long to try to join in one piece. That is something I'm a little unsure of because I'll be by myself. Even with a helper it might be a pain.
I think the easiest will be to cover up the seams with the trim.
Another option I was thinking was to use furring strips 16 ' oc and 1/2'' gos ply. I can add one sheet at a time and the seams will be on a flat surface. Also, if I have to make any slight adjustments to the sheets it will be easier to handle one rather than 3 joined together.
 
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