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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody have any experience with this? Multi layer reflective insulation? Currently we have an attic cat machine and plan to use both to compliment each other. Opinions?
 

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e-shield

We install this frequently with rave reviews from customers. If you have access to it, there is a companion product that can be installed behind siding. Both are sold with energy savings guarantees (25-30%). Go for it! :thumbsup:
 

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E Shield

I'm looking to do this as well but using Radiant Guard instead. Appears to be the same principle. I can't figure out why this product hasn't caught on. Do you think it is best to use it as a compliment to additional insulation?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm looking to do this as well but using Radiant Guard instead. Appears to be the same principle. I can't figure out why this product hasn't caught on. Do you think it is best to use it as a compliment to additional insulation?
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Yes. By itself it's not enough IMO. The best we can get is an r15
 

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Buddy from what i understand its not very effective in our part of the country,i have no experience with it just going by what ive read from another forum,with enough ceiling insulation,attic temperatures are less important,there is also the possibility of moisture condensing on the foil

like i said just some info ive picked up

maybe run it past a building science pro
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Buddy from what i understand its not very effective in our part of the country,i have no experience with it just going by what ive read from another forum,with enough ceiling insulation,attic temperatures are less important,there is also the possibility of moisture condensing on the foil

like i said just some info ive picked up

maybe run it past a building science pro

I never considered the condensation but it seems to me if you have adequate ventillation you should be fine.

I think it may be more effective in a warmer climate but this saves in A/C costs here too. Also radiant heat is reflected back to its source much like a low e film so in theory it should reflect the heat that's rising in the winter.

There are two methods of installation. Ceiling install and roof rafter install. I wonder if a ceiling install would "trap" heat on the upper floor of a two story house in the summer??
 

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i understand its more cost effective to add insulation the ceiling and if your going to increases attic venting the radiant insulation becomes less important

you really have to look at things as total systems instead of supposed values of different components

and if i was investing in energy upgrade equipment i would seriously consider referring to people educated in building science instead of how we think things should work together
seat of the pants engineering some times can do more harm than good
and take the ''testimonials'' and the ''marketers research'' with a grain of salt

jmo
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i understand its more cost effective to add insulation the ceiling and if your going to increases attic venting the radiant insulation becomes less important

you really have to look at things as total systems instead of supposed values of different components

and if i was investing in energy upgrade equipment i would seriously consider referring to people educated in building science instead of how we think things should work together
seat of the pants engineering some times can do more harm than good
and take the ''testimonials'' and the ''marketers research'' with a grain of salt

jmo
Good point. I don't know if your aware that Eshield is a multi layer reflective insulation. IWO.\, fiberglass sandwiched with radiant reflectors
 

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no i checked the web site i understand what its supposed to do
Radiant barriers have been around for a long time

but they are only effective in specific places,other forms of more conventional insulation are probably more cost effective

did you know that tyvek has an attic wrap also?

we are all looking for that ''miracle''product that does it all
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
no i checked the web site i understand what its supposed to do
Radiant barriers have been around for a long time

but they are only effective in specific places,other forms of more conventional insualtion are probably more cost effective

did you know that tyveck has an attic wrap also?

No I wasn't aware they did.
This RB system is a similar system used to insulate HVAC ducting.
I think I agree this is more effective for summer than winter, especially if your home (like mine) has no shade
 

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point is with the more blown in insulation on the cieling you do
the less you have to worry about attic temps

now its possible they are more effective the less insulation you have
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
point is with the more blown in insulation on the cieling you do
the less you have to worry about attic temps

now its possible they are more effective the less insulation you have

We try to sell both OC loose fill with E shield for a complete system. Probably overkill, but I like overkill.

What do you think of these foam systems that cut of all air?
 

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well no air, no water vapor,no condensation
depending on the thickness the dew point should occure somewhere in the middle of the foam

a more viable insulation then the smoke and mirrors of radiant barriers
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
well no air, no water vapor,no condensation
depending on the thickness the dew point should occure somewhere in the middle of the foam

a more viable insulation then the smoke and mirrors of radiant barriers
And then what happens when the foam is saturated? What about the chimney effect? Don't we want air to move through our homes? I know with a total foam system there's a need for air exchangers because the house is so air tight. I worry about walls rotting over time.

I guess I don't undestand the science of it all, but I also don't think RB is smoke and mirros either

I can see it in a basement especially around the perimeter and we use it for window installs.
 

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foam doesn't let air pass to reach the dew point so moisture doesn't condense and yes with any insulation that match the r values of foam your probably going to need air exchangers

i didn't mean any offense with the smoke and mirrors comment
but if you don't know the science behind it,how do you know
where its effective,if it was the best thing since sliced bread you would see it allot more,like i said its been around in some form or another for more years than i know

but i guess its a high profit type of thing,and as long as you can control any kinds of condensation problems i guess it can't hurt
but i think it hasn't been proven to be cost effective in residential applications

in any case good luck with the new buisness:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
foam doesn't let air pass to reach the dew point so moisture doesn't condense and yes with any insulation that match the r values of foam your probably going to need air exchangers

i didn't mean any offense with the smoke and mirrors comment
but if you don't know the science behind it,how do you know
where its effective,if it was the best thing since sliced bread you would see it allot more,like i said its been around in some form or another for more years than i know

but i guess its a high profit type of thing,and as long as you can control any kinds of condensation problems i guess it can't hurt
but i think it hasn't been proven to be cost effective in residential applications

in any case good luck with the new buisness:thumbup:
I took no offense and I'm not disagreeing either. Just trying to educate myself as much as I can. I like to try things in my own home first when I can. That's the next step
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Have you tried it in your home or any homeowners yet, how is the feedback?
Yes but just recently so there's no feedback as of yet
 

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The Science Behind It

There are 3 ways that heat is transferred into or out of a home.
  1. Convection
  2. Conduction
  3. Radiation
Convection is the movement of heat through air... seal your home from air leaks.

Conduction is the movement of heat through materials such as walls, glass, etc... foam, wool, fiber insulation slows down this transfer, but does not eliminate it.

Radiation (historically the most ignored transfer method in homes) is the transfer of heat in its most pure form, heat waves. This is the heat you can feel when you place your hand near a warm object or heat source. Use reflective barriers to send heat back to its source. Ever wondered why satelites are so shiny? Reflective barriers! Wonder what makes low-e glass more efficient? It's a reflective barrier!

A home that does not address all three of these transfer methods is not as efficient as it can be. Studies have shown that about 70% of heat loss in a home is due to radiation.

Consider this winter-time scenario in a typical home. Warm air rises and is collected along the ceiling. The drywall absorbs the heat and is passed along to the insulation in the attic. The insulation slows the transfer of heat to the attic, but it still lets much of it through (verify this yourself with a thermal leak detector on a cold night). The heat is radiated into the attic from the insulation and disapates into the cold air. Install a reflective barrier a couple of inches above the insulation and escaping heat is reflected back into the insulation, and ultimately, your home.

In summer it works the same, but in reverse. Heat radiated from your hot roof is reflected away from your ceiling.

Important notes for the DIY... ALWAYS leave an air space on both sides of the barrier. If you don't, heat will conduct through the barrier and your results will be less than optimal. NEVER seal edges and seams. Your structure needs to breathe.
 
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