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Well like the topic says, I am the drywall guy before you guys get there. I am doing more and more remodel work, and finding more and more people don’t want to hire a drywall guy and bother with having to get another guy to paint.

Before I mainly just worked on big jobs where there was always a painter around that I could have do things like prime before a skim coat if the wall was beat up or something if needed. I never even paid attention to what was used, once it was done I did my thing.

But like I said since I am doing smaller jobs now, to keep them I need to attempt to be the painter. Don't worry, I'm not telling anyone I am a pro painter when I take jobs. Just wondering if I could ask a few questions.

Before skim coating if the paper is torn or the walls are in bad shape I normally had the painters just throw a coat of primer on all the walls, and a coat on ceilings before a texture if it wasn't going to get painted afterwards. Pretty sure just from the smell they always used an oil based primer.

What primer do you guys like to use for this? Can you recommend a specific product? And do you use the same primer on top of the skim coat?

For top coats, I will most likely use latex. Any particular kind you guys like over others? I was looking at the BM site today and also wondering what your default sheen is if the customer doesn’t request a certain one.

I will have plenty of other questions when I think of them I'm sure..

Appreciate your time.
Will
 

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Will said:
Well like the topic says, I am the drywall guy before you guys get there. I am doing more and more remodel work, and finding more and more people don’t want to hire a drywall guy and bother with having to get another guy to paint.

Before I mainly just worked on big jobs where there was always a painter around that I could have do things like prime before a skim coat if the wall was beat up or something if needed. I never even paid attention to what was used, once it was done I did my thing.

But like I said since I am doing smaller jobs now, to keep them I need to attempt to be the painter. Don't worry, I'm not telling anyone I am a pro painter when I take jobs. Just wondering if I could ask a few questions.

Before skim coating if the paper is torn or the walls are in bad shape I normally had the painters just throw a coat of primer on all the walls, and a coat on ceilings before a texture if it wasn't going to get painted afterwards. Pretty sure just from the smell they always used an oil based primer.

What primer do you guys like to use for this? Can you recommend a specific product? And do you use the same primer on top of the skim coat?

For top coats, I will most likely use latex. Any particular kind you guys like over others? I was looking at the BM site today and also wondering what your default sheen is if the customer doesn’t request a certain one.

I will have plenty of other questions when I think of them I'm sure..

Appreciate your time.
Will
Try looking at the Zinsser website at www.zinsser.com for excellent primers, both latex and oil. Look in the Products section for a good description. This is what I tend to use. PS - I am in the process of learning taping and skimming....a skill that I am beginning to appreciate more and more everyday as my clients are asking for both.

Zeebo
 

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For torn drywall or beat up walls, Zinsser's GARDZ just plain kicks ass. Nothing compares to its performance. Water-based, dries fast to a hard, shellac-like surface. It is a joy to float over. It does have a potent smell, but I can't say enough how good this stuff is. Always strain it before using, as it skins along the inside of the can. And it consistency is very watery, and takes some getting used to. But it can't be beat.

For top coat, default sheen should always be flat. It hides imperfections from crappy drywallers (oops, did I say that out loud? :cheesygri ), touches up easy, etc. etc. I always push for flat when applicable. Some homeowners will cry that they want something washable, so in this case I push top of the line flats, which now-a-days are washable. Ben Moore's Regal Matte, Muralos Ceramic? something or other, and others are flat and washable.

BTW, Will, your job is safe with me. I can fix holes, etc. but won't touch full seams or drywall jobs. Leave that stuff to the pro in that field.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Appreciate the replies guys..

GARDZ sounds like the best product to prep all the walls before a skim coat and the ceiling before a texture. Do you also use this product on top of the new skim coat as well? Or is there something better for that, if possible I would like to stick with as few of different products as I can. Less chance for me to screw up if I only have 1 primer for everything.. Before skim, after skim, before texturing ceiling, etc :)

How ironic you mentioned always push flat, I just spoke with one of the jobs and they request any sheen BUT flat.. Hah. They want white satin for all the trim and either Satin or semigloss for the walls.

So here is my plan, comments appreciated

After cleaning the walls, prime walls and ceiling with GARDZ at once and skim coat the walls and reprime with GARDZ

Use the BM acrylic latex enamel Satin Impervo for all the trim

For the top coat I am unsure. They want me to use Benjamin Moore paint, but there seems to be a lot of latex interior choices in Satin/Semi-gloss.. Which one would you recommend if I can't push the Regal Matte finish? They may have said no flat because they didn't know you can clean some of them.

Thanks again
Will
 

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I would say whichever way your customer tries to go, recommend that they use the satin on the walls and a semi or high gloss on the trim. You don't want the walls shinier than the trim, it just won't look right IMHO. I don't use any BM products, I'm all SW so I only use BM when the customer is extremely insistant. As for my default sheen on walls, it's usually Duration Matte finish, and semi-gloss trim. The matte finishes touch up well and look very nice, not to mention they are washable. Werks fer me! I remember we went through alot of BM Super Spec with one company I worked for....should do good for a top-coat on your job...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the tip on the trim being shinier than the walls, never really thought about it now that I do you are right.. Guess that’s why I am not a painter.. :)

They are set on the trim being Satin Impervo because I guess they have some other doors in the house painted Satin Impervo and will be over time having them all painted the same. So trim is dead set on Satin. I will be painted 2 of those I think.

Walls I think as long as they can wash the finish they are fine with the BM Regal Matte or similar sheen would work. I would like as much hiding as possible since these walls are old and even with several skim coats it just isn't new drywall. I also have a to try and blend some new with the old, and like I said even with skim coats new drywall looks different than 40 year old stuff with probably 8+ layers of paint no matter what.

What is "AquaVelvet"sheen like? I know semigloss, satin, gloss.. Other than that I have no clue :) Not even really sure what eggshell looks like.

I am not sure why they are forcing Benjamin Moore, but I find it easier to sometimes just go along than ask questions. In this case it doesn’t really matter to me, so I would rather give them what they want than use something else that they may pick at and said "well if you used BM....."

Thanks for all the info guys..
 

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The Aquavelvet is an eggshell sheen.

Sheen levels go like this, from dull to shiny:
Flat
Eggshell
Pearl
Satin
Semi-gloss
Gloss

Be aware if the existing Satin Impervo is older, its oil based. The stuff you will be using will most likely be the new Water-borne Satin Impervo. Prep the old to make sure the new will adhere, or you got a world of hurt coming up.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks so much for your quick and informative replies, but now you have brought more questions.. :)

The doors they are talking about have been done fairly recently, and they said it was the Water-borne. I guess the owner did a few, but got sick of it and doesn't want to do anymore.

Anything special I should do to the doors so I am not in that world of hurt? My plan was to wash down with a no rinse TSP.. I think I have some jasco or something.. I was just going to use a sander and sand down all the flat parts to even it out and get it smooth, but I did have a question on the best way to clean the panels. I think they are 4 or 6 raised panel doors with some build up in the panels and corners. Some cracked paint along those edges where the panels float. What is the best way to clean out those areas? Just strip the areas I can't sand maybe? If so any stripper you recommend?

Then prime and paint with the Impervo.. And another question, what type of primer would you recommend for the wood doors?

Thanks so much again
 

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Get yourself a small fingernail scrub brush, and hit all the cracks/crevices/edges with that. Wipe down whole thing with a damp rag. Fill divots or holes with wood putty. Use a medium grit sanding sponge, and hit all surfaces of the door. The sponge sideways fits perfectly into the panel edges. Remove all dust with a tack cloth. Prime with Ben Moore's Fresh Start acrylic primer. Resand lightly with fine grit sponge, tack off, and paint. You might need to sand more on bad areas.

****EDIT**********
The dude below me added the caulk phase. I forgot about that, he must have done that while I was typing! :cheesygri
 

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Often times on wood doors those panels have been or need to be caulked because of the way the door is assembled or there will be un-sightly gaps. If they're cracked you'll have to scrape out the cracks in the corners and get yourself a sanding sponge. Wrap some 150 grit around the sponge and you can sand the rest of the bad stuff out of those corners. Once sanded smooth, clean em up with a dust brush (old brush used for dusting), wipe with a damp cloth, caulk the edges of the panels with a quality siliconized latex caulk, then paint. The sanding sponge makes it easy to get into those corners and sand em pretty good, and the caulk will help keep those corners from cracking again. Filling the gaps with paint will only result in more cracks later.

I'm sure PWG will be around again to tell you what BM primer to use...it's been so long I can't remember half thier products.


****EDIT**** Nevermind, he got in here BEFORE me, lol. He must have done that while I was typing! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I cannot thank you guys enough for all this information. I spent countless hours looking for painting sites with the information before asking and couldn't come up with anything but generic answers. This was by far some of the fastest and best information I have ever received.

I actually just spoke with the owners a little bit ago, they didn't want the regal matte flat finish. Said they just don't like a flat look. They seem ok with the AquaVelvet Eggshell though.

Last few question(for now im sure)

For the doors, what about the paint that has built up from runs and pooled into corners? What's the best way to deal with that? I thought I would have to strip areas like that.. Also on the repairs you suggested wood putty, and some of the doors do need repairs from dents and hooks removed. I was going to use a paintable epoxy but if a putty works I will just use that.

And lately, I would like to get the smoothest/flattest finish on the freshly skimmed walls. If I use the BM AquaVelvet Eggshell what roller nap should I use? 3/8th? 1/4th?

Thanks
 

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Very good thread.
Unless I overlooked it, I think it might be helpful to suggest checking those doors to make sure they are latex. It was stated that the homeowner had used latex for their topcoat, but were the doors checked? The quick check tip: dampen rag with alcohol (household will do) if paint lifts it's latex if it doesn't then it's an oil base.
Just my 2 cents
Good luck.
Brenda
 
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