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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a job a few months ago that had 10ft walls. We made sure the tapered edges met, so there was a 2ft tall piece that either want against the floor or the ceiling. Out of curiousity, what do most of you guys do? The guys that did the other units put the 2 ft piece in the middle.
 

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It would depend on the length of the wall not just height. From what you said I would either stagger the joint. Or buy 10ft lengths of drywall
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It would depend on the length of the wall not just height. From what you said I would either stagger the joint. Or buy 10ft lengths of drywall
And do what with the 10ft lengths of drywall, stand them up so the tapered edge seams are vertical? I ran the boards so the tapered edged seams are horizontal and staggered the butt joints
 

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Again depending on the length of the wall, but say for example the wall is 20 ft.
If you stand them up not counting the corners you would have 40 ft of seams with no butt joints at all.
If you go horizontal then you have 40 ft of seams and another 20 ft of butt joints.
Therefore go vertical. In my opinion. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am just not a big fan of standing drywall up on residential jobs, maybe its just because I haven't seen it done. Commercial jobs I would on steel framing. I'm not sure if it really matters.
 

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I think you're going to show any waves a lot more by standing the gyp bd vertically rather than horizontally.
 

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dry wall rule cut rock the shortest distance. the least amount of taping. except on a ceiling all ways a cross studs. same rule with ply wood across studs. dry wall laid down makes stronger wall
 

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if vertical is good enough for myron ferguson its good enough for me
Except Myron doesn't but his vertical seams on a stud. He cut's them between the studs and attaches backing, he claims it cuts down on the mud doing it that way. But the backing he uses also doesn't twist like studs do, and they are not attached to the building, so if the house moves or shrinks, the backing doesn't go with it. I wouldn't run sheets vertical while butting them on a stud, never know when a stud will twist or cup and cause a crack.
 

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I would never install rock vertical in residential (no strength in my opinion- did you ever see plywood done this way?) Go horizontal and but between framing. Hang always from callings down, this way you have seams on the bottom (sanding, baseboard, wainscoting,
Furniture, eye level (people look eye level and up).
 

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I would never install rock vertical in residential (no strength in my opinion- did you ever see plywood done this way?)
Around here, we have to install plywood vertical to get adequate nailing around the edges for shear strength. But for drywall it shouldn't matter, unless the plans specify a shear nailing schedule for the drywall. On ceilings you install sheets perpendicular to the joists because you want the strength axis to be perpendicular to prevent sagging. Won't be any sagging on walls though.
 

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Except Myron doesn't but his vertical seams on a stud. He cut's them between the studs and attaches backing, he claims it cuts down on the mud doing it that way. But the backing he uses also doesn't twist like studs do, and they are not attached to the building, so if the house moves or shrinks, the backing doesn't go with it. I wouldn't run sheets vertical while butting them on a stud, never know when a stud will twist or cup and cause a crack.

The OP said that the walls where 10 ft high, I had said use 10ft drywall and go vert, so there would be no butt joints at all.
:thumbsup:
 

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Im no drywall pro for sure but i have been doing a mix of vertical and horizontal lately and so far i have found that vertical is quicker, Has less defelction and looks better when finished. When ever i have seen a wall done horizontal i can always see the butt joints! In the UK i hardly never see them lay it horizontal but when they did they put blocks between each stud right where the joint would be the whole way across. Again you could still see the butt joints but it was a lot more work.
 

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dry wall laid down makes stronger wall
Probably a claim that would be difficult to substantiate except anecdotally.

A ten foot sheet laid vertically will have the perimeter completely fastened to the structure. And there are no horizontal hinge points. Drywall laid horizontally has the entire recessed edge only screwed 16"OC. And extensive horizontal hinge points are introduced into the system.

Which system was "stronger" probably varies depending on the type of structure, the forces expected on it, and settling directions. And even the very definition of "stronger" can vary. Does it mean less likely to have pops and cracked mud joints, or does it mean fall off the walls during a hurricane, tornado, or earthquake.
 

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Check your shear schedule, Those engineers are pretty smart guys.
If it didn't matter there wouldn't be nailing inspections in some areas.
Gluing drywall also increases shear strength
 

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I did a job a few months ago that had 10ft walls. We made sure the tapered edges met, so there was a 2ft tall piece that either want against the floor or the ceiling. Out of curiousity, what do most of you guys do? The guys that did the other units put the 2 ft piece in the middle.
i would've hired a drywall guy:thumbsup:
 

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On wood framing we use the longest board available and lay it horizontally. Eliminating butts is key, put recess to recess whenever possible. Putting the two foot piece in the middle is like running a continuous butt joint around the room, nothing but problems and extra work. Putting the two footer at the bottom, rather than at the top, is usually easier for the finisher and doesn't run the joint above door or window headers.
Standing it up is risky because vertical seams are more likely to be visible due to inconsistent framing and/or cross lighting from windows.
On metal framing we stand the board vertically because the framing is straighter than wood, and will eliminate butt joints. There are special considerations with installing drywall over metal, if you are not familiar with them lay the board horizontally.
 
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